64th Field Artillery Battalion (105MM)


Photo by Hal Barker








Legacy Messages - 1995-1999







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63 Messages

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Entry: 89363
Subject: VIRGIL KISER DURING WW2

Joe Swafford JR. wrote on July 23, 2014


City and State: BATESVILLE AR

Unit: 64TH FIELD ARTILLERY

Service or Relationship: Interested Person

Comments: I recenty found Virgil Kiser's WW2 Uniform for sale, and bought it. It has his name written in it. The Ike type jacket is in decent shape, the 25th Div. Patch is in Bullion, along with his Presidential Unit Citation, ribbon Bars, Ruptured Duck was never sewed on. Has the proper brass with US and Artillery Insignia on the collars. If any family member is interested in this item, please email me. Im not out to make a profit, just wanted to see if any family members would love to have his Jacket and awards.

Keywords:



Entry: 89255
Subject: LUZON, NARA

Alec Rothrock wrote on July 2, 2014


City and State: DENVER CO

Unit: HQ & HQ BTRY, 64TH FA BN

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: My late father, Gordon G. Rothrock of Chicago (Evanston), served in World War Two with the Headquarters and Headquarters Battery of the 64th Field Artillery Batallion, which was part of the 35th Regimental Combat Team of the 25th Army Infantry Division. He was aboard USS LST 1029 when it landed at Lingayen Gulf in the Philippines on 11 January 1945. After the Battle of Luzon he served with the occupation forces, apparently in Nara, Japan. Curiously, one of his occupations in the army was listed as Athletic Instructor. He was credited with being the player-manager of the 25th Division baseball team, which tied for the championship of the Southern League of Japan, presumably in 1946. He left Japan in September 1946 and was discharged in November of that year.

Keywords:



Entry: 86896
Subject: MEMORIES

David Tuttle wrote on August 2, 2013


City and State: HUBER HEIGHTS OH

Unit: HQ BATTERY 64TH FA BN, 25TH INF DIV.

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran

Comments: Served from Late Jan 51 to Dec 51. Would like to hear from all
who remember. The RR crew in Aug-Sep 51 to Toko, Japan (Survey
Sgt, Personnel Sgt and Sgt George Salvester of G Co 35 Regt,and
Officers and men in the Bn FD Section and the bugout van.

Keywords: Bugout Van



Entry: 79262
Subject: WILLIAM TOWN

Mary Ann Conners wrote on June 10, 2011

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit: B BRY 64TH FA

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: Comments:
Looking for anyone who may have served with my father in the 64th FA BN. Dishcharged March 1954 after approximately 2 years. Was on the troop ship Gen. John Pope to San Francisco CA. Unable to find discharge papers. He was from Brockway PA, departed from Pittsburgh PA. Records were destroyed in the St. Louis fire.

Keywords: B Btry 64th FA  



Entry: 77133
Subject: PUNCHBOWL TAVERN, 25TH DIV. 64TH FIELD ARTILLERY. BATTERY B. 52-53

Roy Pena wrote on December 15, 2010


City and State: BAKERSFIELD CA

Unit: 64TH FIELD ARTILLERY 25TH DIV

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: My grandpa was in Korea from 1952 through 1953. He was in the 64th Field Artillery, 25th Division, Battery B, 105mm, somewhere in the Punchbowl. One of the bunkers there was named "The Punchbowl Tavern." I would love to hear from anyone who might know my grandpa.

Keywords: Louis B Montecino. "Monty." The Punchbowl Tavern. 64th Field Artillery. 25th Division. Battery B. Korea 52-53



Entry: 76313
Subject: SWAGGER STICK

Tony Levermann wrote on October 1, 2010


City and State: TX

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran

Comments: I have a swagger stick, stainless steal and silver, it has wings with shell in center, also has US with 64 has cross cannons with F and a hula girl. I am trying to find out who were the commanders of this unit while in hawaii from 1941 thru 1958 when disbanded. This swagger stick is solid steel with a very detailed handle and a very sharp dagger or short sword inside. Any information about the 64th coast artillery unit and battery F. The swagger stick most likely belonged to the Unit Commander.

Keywords: Swagger stick F battery 64th anti aircraft bn



Entry: 76273
Subject: THOMAS E. BOYER

Michael Boyer wrote on September 27, 2010


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran

Comments: My Father served in Korea with the 64th FA. He passed away in Dec 09. He NEVER talked about his service or mentioned his unit. I came across a certificate of completion for PLDC for the 64th FA Korea. Any one who knew my father, Thomas E. (Bud) Boyer from Datto Arkansas, I would love to hear from you.

Keywords:



Entry: 73411
Subject: LOOKING FOR ANYONE WHO KNEW JERRY BOWERS1951-1953

Michel Bowers wrote on February 3, 2010


City and State: CHARLESTON SC

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments:

Keywords: Jerry Bowers was in Korea from 1951 to 1953 and was assigned to the HQ BTRY 64 FA BN. He was awarded three Bronze medals and a United Nations Service medal It is unknown who he served with and what he did to earn his medals.



Entry: 73082
Subject: LOOKING FOR ANY ONE WHO KNEW LT. HAMILTON E. READER

Cole Lagano wrote on January 10, 2010

Email Update Needed



City and State: PORT ST LUCIE FL

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Interested Person

Comments:

Keywords: I have an old memory for the $2 club. I found a dollar that had this Lt's name and a ton of friends names but its very hard to decipher. All i know is its from the 64th F.A Bn. signed on Sept.26 1944. Im extremly interested in helping restore some memories, so if this helps any one, contact me. Semper Fi.



Entry: 69406
Subject: 64TH AAA GUN BN, ELMENDORF AIR BASE

Robert Gilliland wrote on March 8, 2009


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Other

Comments: I am OR State KWVA Historian

Keywords: 64th AAA Gun Bn
Elmendorf Air Base Alaska
40 mm Bofor, Alaska



Entry: 66783
Subject: ACCOUNTS OF BATTERY DEFENSE 2-3 SEPT 1950

Harold Campbell JR. wrote on August 4, 2008


City and State: RESTON VA

Unit: 64TH FIELD ARTILLERY BN (105MM)

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: Two field artillery traditions: "Continue the mission," and "Defend the
guns" must be instilled in all artillerymen.

CHAPTER THREE

THE ARTILLERY SCHOOL: DEFENSE OF FIELD ARTILLERY AGAINST GROUND ATTACK

Defense of a Battery Position

* North Korean Communist forces appeared to be near complete victory at
the end of August and during the first part of September of 1950. Along
the southern coast of Korea enemy troops were within thirty miles of
Pusan, the only port and supply base left to the United Nations army.
American troops holding this Pusan perimeter at the time consisted of
four divisions and a brigade occupying a line in the general area of the
Naktong River from Waegwan south to Masan-a straight-line distance of
seventy miles. The irregular front line was twice that long. South
Korean soldiers manned the northern section of the perimeter from
Waegwan to Pohang-dong on the east coast.

At the beginning of September the North Koreans began a powerful drive
against the southern end of the perimeter defended by the U.S. 2d and
25th Infantry Divisions. These attacks achieved limited success and
carried the combat into the rear areas behind the American front lines.
One penetration fell against the 35th Infantry, a regiment of the 25th
Division, soon after midnight on the morning of 3 September. The enemy
pushed Company B from its position, surrounded Company G and the 1st
Battalion command post, and then attacked several batteries of
artillery. Among the artillery units, the heaviest fighting took place
within the gun position of Battery A, 64th Field Artillery Battalion,
which was in direct support of the 35th Infantry. The headquarters of
each of these units was located in Haman at that time.

On the night of 2-3 September Battery A was in position two and a half
miles north of Haman near a main road and single-track railroad runPage
32

ning east and west between Masan and Chinju. The narrow road from Haman
joined the Masan-Chinju road at the small village of Saga, the buildings
of which were strung along the main road. [1] Because of North Korean
infiltrators, artillery units were alert to the necessity of defending
their own positions and the battery commander (Capt. Leroy Anderson)
kept his area as compact as possible. Three or four hundred yards south
of the road there was a low ridge shaped like a half circle and forming
a shallow bowl. Here Captain Anderson positioned five of his six
howitzers. Since the area was too small to accommodate all of the
pieces, he placed the other howitzer on the north side of a railroad
track that paralleled the Masan road and divided the battery area. The
fire direction center, on the south side of the tracks, was operating in
a tent erected in a four-foot-deep dugout within shouting distance of
the guns. The wire section had its switchboard north of the tracks in a
dugout fifteen to twenty yards south of the cluster of houses, a few of
which were used by men of the wire section as living quarters. In
addition to the low ridge, there was only one other terrain feature of
importance-a gully, about four feet deep, next to the railroad tracks.

Around the battery position Captain Anderson set up ten defensive posts
including four .50-caliber machine guns, three .30-caliber machine guns,
one observation and listening post, and two M16 halftracks each mounting
four .50-caliber machine guns. Four of the posts were on the ridge
around the gun position and were connected by telephone wire. The others
were within shouting distance.

Until 0245 on 3 September the battery fired its usual missions in
support of the 35th Infantry. The night was dark, and there was a heavy
fog in the area-a condition common along the southern coast of Korea
during the summer. The battery first sergeant (MSgt. William Parker) was
the first to suspect trouble. He was standing near the switchboard
dugout when he noticed several men moving along the main road.

He called to them, "Who's there?" and then, when they continued walking,
he yelled "Halt!"

Three North Koreans were pulling a machine gun (the type mounted on
small, cast-iron wheels) down the road. They moved down the road a few
more steps and then dropped into a ditch, turned their gun toward the
battery position, and opened fire. Almost immediately there was enemy
fire from several other directions, a large part of it coming from the
ridgeline that partially surrounded the main part of the battery. At the
south end of the battery position the North Koreans had three machine
guns in action against the gun sections and, soon after the first shots
were fired, they had pulled another machine gun into place along the
road in Saga. From the beginning, the action was divided between the two
parts of the battery, divided by the railroad tracks.

Sgt. Herbert L. Rawls, Jr., the wire team chief, saw the North Koreans
at the time Sergeant Parker challenged them. Realizing that there would
be trouble, he ran first to one of the native houses by the road to
awaken several men from his section who were sleeping there, then to the
switchboard dugout to warn those men. Near the edge of the switchboard
hole Sgt. Joseph R. Pursley was kneeling on the ground splicing a wire.
Just as Rawls got there a North Korean appeared and killed both men with
a burp gun. He then threw a grenade into the switchboard dugout. The
explosion killed two of the three men in the hole; the third man, Cpl.
John M. Pitcher, was not seriously injured. He continued to operate the
switchboard throughout the night with the two bodies beside him in the
hole.

All this had occurred within a few minutes. At the same time two other
events were taking place in the same area. At the first sign of action,
Cpl. Bobbie H. McQuitty ran to his 3/4-ton truck upon which was mounted
a machine gun. He had parked his truck near the road and now, by the
time he reached it, the North Koreans had rolled one of their machine
guns (one of the two they had in Saga) up just in front of it. With the
two machine guns pointed toward each other at a distance of not more
than thirty yards, McQuitty's gun failed to fire. He jumped from the
truck and ran across the rice paddies toward the front lines of the
infantrymen where he had seen a tank the previous afternoon. He now
hoped to get help from it. By this time, neither the other two machine
guns on that side of the railroad, nor the quad .50s, could fire against
the North Koreans in that area without endangering men of the wire
section.

Meanwhile, the communications men whom Sergeant Rawls had awakened just
before he was killed tried to get away from the building in which they
had been sleeping, hoping to rejoin the main section of the battery. In
one room of the building were three men, PFC Harold W. Barker, PFC
Thomas A. Castello, and PFC Santford B. Moore. Barker left first,
running. He had gone only a few steps when he saw one of the North
Korean machine guns directly ahead. He turned quickly and dashed back to
the house, but as he reached the doorway a bullet struck his knee.
Castello and Moore pulled him back into the building and decided to
remain in the house. They put Barker on the floor, and then stood in a
corner of the room as close to the wall as possible. Unfortunately,
several days before this Barker and Castello had picked up two small
pups, which now shared the same room. The pups chewed on some paper and
made considerable noise. In an adjoining room there had been another man
who also tried to escape, but as he stepped from the building he
encountered fifteen or twenty Communist soldiers standing in a group
just outside the door. One of them shot him in the mouth and killed him.

Within a few minutes after the North Koreans appeared, five members of
the communications section were dead and another man was wounded.
Thereafter the enemy fired the two machine guns toward the area of the
howitzers but made no attempt to move against the guns or even to search
the area for other Americans.

Immediately after the first shot was fired against the men near the
switchboard, three machine guns at the south end of the battery position
opened fire against the howitzer sections. Two of these were in place on
the low ridgeline at the left front of the guns and a third fired from
the left rear. In addition, there was fire from a half dozen or more
enemy riflemen. Of the six guns, the three nearest the ridge were under
the heaviest fire. There was an immediate interruption of the fire
missions while the crews took cover in their gun pits, which were deep
enough to afford some protection. There was a period of several minutes,
then, before the artillerymen realized what was happening and determined
the extent of and direction of the enemy fire.

Meanwhile, on the left, an enemy soldier threw several grenades at the
pit occupied by MSgt. Frederick J. Hammer's section. One of the grenades
exploded inside the pit, killing one man and wounding several others;
another exploded in an ammunition pit and set fire to over a hundred
105-mm shells stored there. The men manning the machine-gun posts along
the ridge opened fire when the action began but soon realized the enemy
had already penetrated to the battery position. They pulled back, going
north toward the other halftrack mounting the quad .50s. This weapon
fired just a few rounds before its power traversing mechanism failed
and, when it could not be operated by hand, the gun crew backed the
vehicle a short distance to the gully by the railroad tracks.

It was just about this time that the battalion headquarters called
Battery A to ask the reason for interrupting the fire mission. The
battery executive officer (Lieut. Kincheon H. Bailey, Jr.) answered the
telephone at the fire direction tent. Bailey had heard the machine guns
firing but was not concerned about it since at that time the front-line
infantrymen were not far away and the artillerymen could often hear the
noise of automatic weapons and small arms. In turn, he called the gun
crews to ask them. Sergeant Hammer and four other gun sections reported
their situation but the sixth section, commanded by PFC Ernest R.
Arnold, was under such intense machine-gun fire that no one wanted to
reach for the telephone on the edge of the gun pit. Bailey reported back
to the battalion and went out to investigate for himself.

During the several minutes required to relay this information to
battalion headquarters the situation in the battery position developed
fast. Sergeant Hammer, seeing his ammunition burning, ordered the men in
his section to make a dash for the gully by the railroad tracks. Within
the next few minutes the men manning two other guns managed to escape
and get back to this gully. Meanwhile, one of the platoon sergeants
(MSgt. Germanus P. Kotzur) had raced over to the howitzer north of the
railroad tracks and ordered the gun section to lay direct fire against
the hill from which the enemy soldiers had apparently come.

It was about the time the first of these shells landed that Lieutenant
Bailey left the fire direction tent to find out what was happening. The
powder in Hammer's ammunition pit was burning brightly by this time,
illuminating one end of the battery position. As Bailey walked toward
that area he saw North Koreans walking around the gun and concluded the
crew was dead or gone. He ran back to the nearest howitzer and told the
chief of section (Cpl. Cecil W. Meares) to start firing against the
ridge. Two howitzers fired a total of eighteen rounds, which burst a
hundred and fifty to two hundred yards away. Bailey also urged the gun
crew to start firing their side arms against the North Koreans who now
occupied the next gun pit-the one Sergeant Hammer's crew had abandoned.
For five or ten minutes Corporal Meares's men fired at the enemy
soldiers and threw grenades toward the gun pit. Then Bailey and Kotzur
decided it would be best to get the crews back to the protection of the
gully. They stopped the artillery fire and began calling for the other
crews to move back. To give these men some protection, Sgt. Henry E.
Baker ran to a nearby 2 1/2-ton truck which carried a ring-mounted
caliber .50 machine gun and began firing this toward the North Koreans.
PFC Richard G. Haussler went with Baker to feed the ammunition belts
through the gun. These two men, although up high where they could be
seen from the entire area as long as the ammunition was burning
brightly, fired five boxes of ammunition (1,250 rounds) through the gun
in about ten minutes. The battery commander (Captain Anderson) set out
on an inspection of the battery position to make certain none of his men
remained in foxholes or in the gun pits.

It was about 0315 when all of the cannoneers reached the gully by the
railroad tracks-half an hour after the action began. As it happened, the
Catholic chaplain of the 25th Division (Capt. John T. Schag) had visited
the battery earlier in the day and had decided to spend the night there.
When the fighting began Father Schag took charge of a group of men who
had been sleeping near him and guided them to the gully then used as the
battery defensive position. Once in the gully, he gathered the wounded
men together and then helped the medics care for them. Captain Anderson
and Sergeant Kotzur organized the men for the defense of the gully.
Everyone was now in this gully except for three men in the fire
direction tent; Corporal Pitcher, who was still operating the battery
switchboard; and Barker, Castello, and Moore, who were still waiting
quietly in the house in Saga.

Enemy activity decreased after the men of the battery consolidated their
position in the gully although there was a brisk exchange of rifle fire.
The battalion commander (Lt. Col. Arthur H. Hogan) called several times
to find out what was happening and offered help from one of the other
batteries in the battalion. One man at the fire direction tent (Sgt.
Carl Francis) yelled to Lieutenant Bailey to ask if he wanted some 155-
mm fire placed in the area, and Bailey said they'd like to have some on
the hill in front of the guns. Colonel Hogan was familiar with the hill
and, having good original data, got the first shells squarely on the
hill.

Bailey yelled back to the fire direction center, "Right 50; drop 100;
fire for effect."

The men around him groaned when they heard this command, so Bailey
changed it to "drop 50; fire for effect."

Colonel Hogan asked for two rounds from the battery of medium artillery
and the rounds fell just in front of the guns. Soon after this a tank
came down the Masan road from the north and began firing into the enemy
positions. It was the tank for which Corporal McQuitty had gone after
his machine gun jammed at the beginning of the action. This helped to
reduce the enemy activity although there was scattered rifle fire until
the first signs of light that morning. The enemy soldiers then
disappeared, and the gun sections returned to their howitzers to assess
the damage. The North Koreans had killed 7 men and wounded 12 others of
Battery A, destroyed four trucks, and let the air out of the tires on
one of the howitzers. On three of the howitzer tubes they had written in
chalk the numbers of their company, platoon, and squad. Otherwise, the
guns were not damaged. There were 21 dead North Korean soldiers in the
battery position when the action was all over. Captain Anderson
regrouped his battery on the north side of the tracks and resumed the
firing of normal supporting missions.

* DISCUSSION

Every soldier must be mentally trained for the shock of battle and
prepared for instant defense of his own and his unit's position. In
fluid situations, it must be expected that the front will not be
stabilized and that hostile action will develop well to the rear. Under
these conditions, artillery position areas must be selected that not
only will permit accomplishing the primary mission of fire support but
will also facilitate local defense against enemy action that might
interrupt the fire support.

This example demonstrates how an attack of limited strength against an
inadequately prepared battery position can be effective in neutralizing
a battery. To avoid such interruptions in fire support, batteries must
obtain an all-around, completely integrated defense. This is
accomplished by assigning primary and contingent sectors of
responsibility to each gun section, by preparing the firing positions of
the individual pieces to insure complete cannon fire coverage of the
position's perimeter, and by developing fire plans to cover all possible
avenues of approach. Into this plan is integrated the fire of the
battery's automatic weapons and rocket launchers. Each individual of the
battery must be assigned and be ready to occupy a specific defense
position. Specific personnel must be designated in advance as a reserve
force.

An alarm system must be established and all battery personnel actually
rehearsed in the actions they will take when the alarm is given. Day and
night security must be completed by installing sufficient observation
and listening posts, coupled with adequate communications and patrols
that visit and maintain contact with adjacent units.

This action contains incidents of individual bravery and courage, of
demonstrated devotion to duty, of the use of initiative, and of
leadership in an emergency. But how was it possible for the enemy to
walk down the road and into the battery position? The obvious answer is
that the defensive organization was unsatisfactory. Weapons had not been
checked to insure that they would fire. An alarm or alert system, if
used, did not work. How much better to stop the enemy outside a battery
position than to let him neutralize the battery, kill and wound
soldiers, and destroy materiel. A well-organized and alert defense would
have enabled Battery A to repel this attack with a minimum of effort.

* NOTE

[1] Information used to prepare this account is based upon a personal
interview with Capt. Kincheon H. Bailey and six members of Battery A,
64th FA Battalion. This interview was conducted by the author on 3
September l951 near Kumhwa, Korea. Captain Bailey also furnished
additional information in four letters to the author. These were dated
13 October 1951, 4 February, 22 February and 1 March 1952.

Keywords: Battery Defense 2-3 Sept 1950

THE ARTILLERY SCHOOL: DEFENSE OF FIELD ARTILLERY AGAINST GROUND ATTACK



Entry: 66632
Subject: CPL HAROLD CAMPBELL (WOUNDED 3 SEPT 1950)

Harold Campbell JR. wrote on July 23, 2008


City and State: RESTON VA

Unit: 64TH FIELD ARTILLERY BN (105MM)

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: beloved father, Harold E. Campbell Jr, (Sonny) was wounded on Sept 3, 1950 is listed as a field arty operations specilist. have photo of him carrying thompson with drum clip. Spent <>3 years in Korea.

Looking for action accounts of his unit, him.

passed away July 7, 1993 (cancer)

very respectfully
MSGT Dave Campbell USMC (Ret) "he hated Marines"

Keywords:



Entry: 61353
Subject: LOOKING FOR OLD BUDDIES

Steve Mccloskey SR. wrote on June 21, 2007


City and State: SHOREWOOD MN

Unit: BATTERY A 64TH FIELD ART

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran

Comments: like to talk to anyone who remebers me Especialy Pete Tiernan Johm Mc Que

Keywords: Zama Kobe Nara



Entry: 59774
Subject: MEMBERS OF A BTRY 64TH FA BN WRITE ME

Joseph Carpentiere JR. wrote on January 23, 2007

Email Update Needed



City and State: LORAIN OH

Unit: A BTRY 64TH FA BN

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran

Comments:

Keywords:



Entry: 59313
Subject: HELLO

Arthur R. Somerville wrote on October 21, 2006


City and State:

Unit: AIR SECTION HG.B'TRY 64 FA BN

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran

Comments:

Keywords: 1062 HEART BREAK RIDGE ETC



Entry: 56939
Subject: 25TH DIV 64TH FIELD ARTILLERY NARA JAPAN

Lisa Boutotte wrote on May 2, 2006


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: My Grandfather T5 William Thomas Houlihan is searching for anyone who served with him in the 25th, 64th field artillery unit in Nara Japan cir 1946. Especially Benjamin F. Brown. Any info would be appreciated. Thanks.

Keywords: nara, japan, 64th field artillery, 25th div, cir 1946,



Entry: 56810
Subject: BILL TOWN

MaryAnn Town wrote on April 23, 2006

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit: 25TH INFANTRY 64TH FA BN B BATTERY

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: Looking for anyone who may have served with my father in the 64th FA BN. Dishcharged March 1954 after approximately 2 years. Was on the troop ship Gen. John Pope to San Francisco CA. Unable to find discharge papers. He was from Brockway PA, departed from Pittsburgh PA. Records were destroyed in the St. Louis fire.

email to pghsteelerfan1@aol.com

Keywords: 64th, San Francisco CA, Brockway PA, 25th infantry



Entry: 55292
Subject: JOHNSON AIR BASE, JAPAN

George Thallheimer JR. wrote on January 20, 2006

Email Update Needed



City and State: MCKINLEYVILLE CA

Unit: BTRY A, 64TH AAA GUN BATTALION

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran

Comments: My unit was off base (Johnson Air Base) near Toyo-ooka-machi. Trying to find buddies but can't remember names. I was on quad 50's ground mount. When I rotated in 1952, Kenneth Merchant was 1st Sgt.

Keywords: Looking for buddies of same unit, on my gun crew.



Entry: 49040
Subject: LIKE TO HEAR FROM DONALD ALLEN

Frank Schlehr wrote on February 19, 2005


City and State: WILLIAMSVILLE NY

Unit: 64TH FIELD ARTILLERY. 8TH.ARMY NARA, JAPAN 1947

Service or Relationship: Friend of Veteran

Comments: Would like to hear from Don Allen.

Keywords: Service Battery of the 64th Field Artillery,25th. Division, 8th. Army in Nara, Japan



Entry: 46855
Subject: UNIT CITIATIONS

Bob Nagatoshi wrote on November 14, 2004

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: My father Corporal Robert Nagatoshi served in Btty B 64th FA 25th ID in Korea 51-52. I am trying to organize his shadowbox and would like to find out what unit citation his unit rates. Any help for greatly be appreciated.

Semper Fi

Bob Nagatoshi
Sgt USMC

Keywords: aikibob



Entry: 44123
Subject: PUNCHBOWL

Timothy Higginbotham wrote on June 29, 2004

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: Looking for guys who served with my dad in korea in 1950 in the 64th field artillery, in the 'punchbowl', he's still kicking and would love to contact some of his buddies

Keywords: Punchbowl 64th field artillery battery wayne higginbotham



Entry: 43619
Subject: 64TH FA, 25TH DIV.

Joe Kemp wrote on June 7, 2004


City and State: GRAND PRAIRIE TX

Unit: 64TH FA, 25TH DIV., S-4

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments: It's been a good life that's winding down now (75). Would like to hear from anyone who might remember the names.

Keywords: Pupyong ni, Hill 1062(Potato),George Reppy-NJ, Denver Uri-MN.



Entry: 41614
Subject: ACTIVE DUTY JANUARY 1956 TO COLORS RETIRED

Robert Gay wrote on March 9, 2004

Email Update Needed



City and State: PENFIELD NY

Unit: BTRY A, SCHOFIELD BARRACKS

Service or Relationship: -

Comments: Interested in locating peers (post Korea). I was assigned to Battery A in January 1956(Schofield Barracks) until colors retired. Then assigned to 8th FAB until end of active duty. I'm still in contact with Ollie Mayo, Ed Bispo, Ed Eckert and Walt Hatcher.

Keywords:



Entry: 40821
Subject: LOOKING FOR KOREAN VETERANS WHO MAY HAVE SERVED WITH MY BROTHER

Michael Guillerman wrote on February 13, 2004

Email Update Needed



City and State: UNIONTOWN KY

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: Brothers, I am looking for Korean War Veterans who may have known or served with my brother, Lt. Robert G. Guillerman, deceased. About all of know of his service was that he was trained as an artillery officer. I have discovered he served in Japan and Korea starting in August of 1950 for a period of 16 months. Any and all information would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Mike Guillerman (Vietnam era Veteran.)

Keywords: 64th AAA Gn Bn. Medals: United Nations Service Medal, Korean Service Medal, Army of Occupation Medal with Japan Clasp



Entry: 40820
Subject: LOOKING FOR KOREAN VETERANS WHO MAY HAVE SERVED WITH MY BROTHER

Michael Guillerman wrote on February 13, 2004

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: -

Comments:

Keywords:



Entry: 40195
Subject:

John McMains wrote on January 23, 2004

Email Update Needed



City and State: EUBANK KY

Unit: 64TH FIELD ARTILLERY A BATTERY

Service or Relationship: -

Comments: My new E-mail address is bob_mcmains@yahoo.com

Keywords:



Entry: 40194
Subject: NEW E-MAIL ADDRESS

John McMains wrote on January 23, 2004

Email Update Needed



City and State: EUBANK KY

Unit: 64TH FIELD ARTILLERY A BATTERY

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments: I changed my e-mail address and wanted to post the change. Like to hear from you guys I served with.

Keywords: Nickname: Mac.



Entry: 35734
Subject:

Edmund Dodge wrote on July 24, 2003

Email Update Needed



City and State: AVERILL PARK NY

Unit: 64TH FA BTN 25TH INFANTRY DIV

Service or Relationship: -

Comments:

Keywords:



Entry: 35733
Subject:

Edmund Dodge wrote on July 24, 2003

Email Update Needed



City and State: AVERILL PARK NY

Unit: 64TH FA BTN 25TH INFANTRY DIV

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments:

Keywords:



Entry: 33526
Subject: WERE YOU STATIONED IN HAWAII??

Ronald Simard JR. wrote on April 9, 2003

Deceased

City and State: ST. PETERSBURG FL

Unit: 64TH FIELD ARTY. BN // BRAVO BTRY

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments: Get in touch - like to hear from you !!

Keywords: 1/LtPoynter
1/Lt Reigert
1Lt Mayo
1/Lt Zajac
1/Lt Bisbo
Capt. Harry Watson



Entry: 32855
Subject: 64TH F A BN

Haden Page wrote on March 17, 2003


City and State: OLDSMAR FL

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: my late husband, Haden Page , discharge papers read that he was with the 64th in japan and korea. stating that he received Occupational Medal Co 9 H Q 64th F A BN. and Korean Svc. Medal Sec IX cir 31 EUSAK . His picture also appeared in the Life magazine Dec 25, 1950 issue . Did you know him ? Any information will be appreciated. Thank You, Sunday Page

Keywords: nickname "Red"



Entry: 31937
Subject:

Bobby J. McGuire wrote on February 11, 2003

Email Update Needed



City and State: TALLAHASSEE FL

Unit: A BTRY, 64TH FA BN

Service or Relationship: -

Comments: I am trying to get a roster of people that was with A btry,1949-1951,LT Now retired Col.Kichen Bailey,and SSgt Rufus Cole, now retired Col. We are trying to patch together a roster of personel that served with us in Japan and Korea.

Keywords:



Entry: 31936
Subject:

Bobby J. McGuire wrote on February 11, 2003

Email Update Needed



City and State: TALLAHASSEE FL

Unit: A BTRY, 64TH FA BN

Service or Relationship: -

Comments: I am trying to get a roster of people tat was with A btry,1949-1951,LT Now retired Col.Kichen Bailey,and SSgt Rufus Cole, now retired Col. We are trying to patch together a roster of personel that served with us in Japan and Korea.

Keywords:



Entry: 31929
Subject: A BTRY64TH FA BN, NARA JAPAN JULY49, KOREA NOV L959

Bobby J. McGuire wrote on February 11, 2003

Email Update Needed



City and State: TALLAHASSEE FL

Unit: A BTRY, 64TH FA BN

Service or Relationship: -

Comments: looking for anyone with A btry, Or anyone in 64th fa bn while at Nara, Japan on through June, 1953.Please E Mail or call; Am trying to get a complete roster worked up for Col(ret) KICHEN BAILEY, AND (COL RETIRED) RUFUS COLE.

Keywords:



Entry: 30351
Subject: 67486

John McMains wrote on December 12, 2002

Email Update Needed



City and State: EUBANK KY

Unit: ABTRY 64THFLD

Service or Relationship: -

Comments:

Keywords:



Entry: 30140
Subject: SGT. BILLY BRUCE GILBERT

David Gilbert wrote on December 4, 2002

Email Update Needed



City and State: DAVISON MI

Unit: FORMER US MARINE, MP CO. HQ - SVC. BN. 1ST MAR. DI

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: Over the past two years since my father's death my mother and I have sought out information regarding his military service in Korea. We requested his records and awards and we're disappointed that we only received the Atypical awards given to all Korean War Veterans and an explanation about a fire in 1973 involving most of the Korean War Veteran's records. I'm preparing a Shadow Box to pass down to my father's grandchildren with his decorations. I'd like it to be accurate and seek the help of anyone who may have served with Dad or in his unit. He, like those of us who have faced conflict chose not to discuss the war. All I was ever told was that he was a ammunition truck driver. I wonder if that wasn't just his way of avoiding the conversation. Regardless he's our hero and we intend to honor him and would greatly appreciate any assistance.

Keywords: Billy Gilbert, 64th FA Bn, 25th Inf. Div, Korea 1950 to 1953.



Entry: 28838
Subject: HOESAN-NI, KOREA BATTLE

Jackey Edwards wrote on October 14, 2002

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: I AM A SECOND GENERATION SOLDIER INTERESTED IN ANY INFORMATION ON MY FATHER. HE WAS THE C BATTERY FIRST SERGEANT FROM 2 SEP TO 2 NOV 1950. HIS NAME WAS JACK D. EDWARDS. SHORTLY AFTER HIS TIME IN THIS BATTERY HE RECIEVED A BATTLEFIELD COMMISSION. ALSO, SERVED IN WWII IN VARIOUS ARTILLERY UNITS.

Keywords: BATTERY C, 64TH FA BN



Entry: 28639
Subject: SEARCHING FOR OLD FRIENDS

John McMains wrote on October 3, 2002

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit: A BTRY 64TH FIELD

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments: old army buddies e-mail me

Keywords:



Entry: 27464
Subject: RICHARD GOFF

Richard L. Goff wrote on August 7, 2002

Email Update Needed



City and State: COSTA MESA CA

Unit: 25TH INF DIV ARTILLERY

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments: None

Keywords: 25th Inf Div Artillery from Apr, 1949 thru 6 Jun, 1951 (Japan and Korea) 64th FABn to be specific



Entry: 26753
Subject: SON OF VETERAN

Ben Higginbotham wrote on July 5, 2002

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments: I am a son of Wayne Higginbotham. I believe I have the section he severed in. Any information concerning dad would be appreciated.

Keywords: punch bowl



Entry: 24039
Subject: 64TH F.A. IN CHUNCHON! ANYONE?

C. Taylor wrote on March 18, 2002

Email Update Needed



City and State: AVON IN

Unit: A CO. 602D ASB

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments: I am currently stationed at K-47 Chunchon (now Camp Page.) Just recently some artifacts were dug up beneath the flight line that are from the war. Some 105mm arty casings were found, a shattered K pot and some used C rat peaches cans. Just to let you know! If you have any info/input for me that would be great! Thanks!

Keywords: K-47, Chunchon, 6147, 6148, 6149, 6150



Entry: 22910
Subject: PUNCHBOWL

Crystal Arbogast wrote on February 4, 2002

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: My dad, Ira Eldridge served in Korea in the 25th Infantry, 35th Regiment, 64th Field Artillery. He states he was in Baker Battery. He was there from 1952 to 1953. I would love to hear from anyone that he may or may not know.

Keywords:



Entry: 22597
Subject: ELSTON DELMAR JONES

Gial Kaegi wrote on January 24, 2002


City and State:

Unit: 717 AAA AND 25TH AAA GUN BATTALIONS

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments: Please make contact.

Keywords: 717 AAA Gun Batallion, 25th AAA Gun Batalion, Germany



Entry: 21203
Subject: JULY 50 - 17/OCT/51 AND HQ BN TURK LIASON

John C. Chapman wrote on December 3, 2001

Email Update Needed



City and State: RICHMOND VA

Unit: 64TH FA BN. - HQ. DIV ARTY, 25TH INF DIVISION

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments: Served as Liaison Officer with the Turk Field Artillery Battalion from Jan 1951 to Aug 1951.

Keywords: 9 July 1950 to 17 Oct 1951. 64th Field Artillery Battalion and HQ Division Artillery, 25th Infantry Division.



Entry: 21140
Subject: INFORMATION FOR EDWARD JOSEPH TAYLOR

Arthur E. (Art) Lajeunesse SR. wrote on December 1, 2001

Deceased

City and State: LATHAM NY

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments: I am looking for anyone who served with Edward J. Taylor or knew him to contact me.

Keywords: Cpl. Edward Joseph Taylor was listed MIA Sept. 10, 1950 while serving with HQ Battery 64th FAB, 25th. Inf. Div.



Entry: 19009
Subject: FINDING MEN WHO SERVED 11/50-12/50

John Dodson wrote on August 28, 2001

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit: 64TH FAB

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments: i was in combat in north and south korea.my name
is john r. dodson.

64 field artellery,25 infantry.

need info about any one that was with 64 field artellery,25infantry or can talk to some one that was with me at the time of november\december 1950 north korea fighting the chinese. ptsd or frost bite that i can contact. please email back.
>
> thank u
> john
>

Keywords:



Entry: 18692
Subject: HQ. BTRY. 64TH F.A. BN. 25 DIV.

Paul Ervin wrote on August 14, 2001

Email Update Needed



City and State: BUTLER IN

Unit: HQ.BTRY. 64TH F.A. BN. 25 DIV.

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments: Looking for any one in fire direction, I was at Nara, Japan 1949 Till June 1950, Korea, 1950 and 51, Charles Smith, James True, Larry Serdam (?) Ervin Minburg, or any one who wants to talk,

Keywords:



Entry: 17823
Subject: HQ AND A BATTERY 6/50-9/51

Robert L. Braughton wrote on July 7, 2001

Email Update Needed



City and State: NEWPARIS OH

Unit: HQS-ABTRY 64THFABN. 25THDIV

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments: would like to hear from the guys that was in the 64th field arty.,Bn.

Keywords: June1950 ----Sept,1951



Entry: 17812
Subject: HQ LIASON SEC

Chester Ball wrote on July 7, 2001


City and State: BELLS TX

Unit: HQ. BTRY.

Service or Relationship: -

Comments: Would like to hear for Miller, Thompson, Cookie or any one who remembers me.

Keywords: Liason Section



Entry: 16695
Subject:

Ernest Faass wrote on May 21, 2001

Email Update Needed



City and State: ATLANTA GA

Unit: 64TH FIELD ARTY, 25TH INF, DIV

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments:

Keywords:






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