LST-1123 Sedgwick County


Photo by Hal Barker












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Entry: 88875
Subject: LOOKING FOR SHIPMATES OF MY DAD ROBERT W. FERGUSON

R. Craig Ferguson wrote on May 11, 2014


City and State: HOUSTON TX

Unit: USS LST 1123

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: Looking for fellow shipmates of my Dad Robert W. Ferguson who served on the USS LST 1123 from 1949 till the end of the Korean War not conflict. Sadly he passed away on May 13, 2008.
Interned in The Houston VA Cemetary.

Keywords: RW.....USS LST 1123



Entry: 88562
Subject: U S NAVY

William (Bill) Wernecke JR. wrote on March 18, 2014


City and State: TOWSON MD

Unit: NAVY VETERAN

Service or Relationship: Other

Comments: I SERVED ON THE LST 1123 ,1950-1951 UNDER LT ALBERTO AND CHIEF DONALD BROWN IN THE OPERATIONS DIVISION. I WAS A RESERVISTS WHO WAS ENLISTMENT WAS EXTENDED BY PRES TRUMAN. I ALSO SERVED IN 1945-1946 AT THE END OF WW 2 AND REMAINED A RESERVIST.
HOPE TO HEAR FROM SOMEONE FROM THE 1123.
I REMEMBER SOME NAMES.. LITTLE PERRY BISSET, TAYLOR ENSIGN YECK.

Keywords:



Entry: 75307
Subject: LST 1123 SHIPMATES

Donald Dean Cavanaugh wrote on July 1, 2010


City and State: MAGALIA CA

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: Looking for anyone who served on the LST 1123
from 1950-1953.

Korean War - Inchon, China

Have some pictures.

Keywords: Korean War 1950-1953
Inchon, China



Entry: 60603
Subject: CHECKING FOR SHIP/MATES. JUNE 1950 THRU APRIL I951

Samuel Lee JR. wrote on April 8, 2007


City and State: OMAHA NE

Unit: SK/3 L S T 1123

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran

Comments:

Keywords:



Entry: 50955
Subject: WHO SERVED ABORD L,S,T, 1123 FOOM 1951TO 1953

Don Rushing wrote on May 18, 2005

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit: L,S,T, 1123

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran - Korea

Comments:

Keywords:



Entry: 47050
Subject: SHE WAS A TOUGH OLD LADY

Robert Smith wrote on November 23, 2004

Email Update Needed



City and State: NORTH HOLLYWOOD CA

Unit: LST 1123 ENGINERING DIVISION AUX ENG RM

Service or Relationship: -

Comments: i servered abourd the sedgwick county funny part was is that i worked on her as a civilian marine electrican before enlisting in the navy after a school and boot camp i recieve order to a lst being recommisioned setting in harbor boat works in terminal island california lo and behold it was the same lst so i have a great fondness for her she was decommisioned in dec 1969 i was discharge in nov 1969 she was brought out of moth balls in may of 65 so her last service to the country was almost the same as mine

Keywords:



Entry: 46848
Subject: ZIPPO LIGHTER WITH INSIGNIA

Ernie Williams wrote on November 13, 2004


City and State: GLADSTONE MO

Unit: LST 510

Service or Relationship: -

Comments: I have a lighter from the LST 1123 Sedwick county
signed Commanding Officer William S. Emmerich. I would like for someopne from the 1123 to have the lighter. It was given to me. first one to contact me can have it. Ernie Williams
President MAN
Missouri Amphibious Navy Inc.
2405 Ne Pursell Rd
Gladstone, Mo 64118-5647
816 455-7074
EWILL510@sbcglobal.net

Keywords:



Entry: 28859
Subject: LANDING AT INCHON ABOARD LST 1123

Clyde Queen SR. wrote on October 15, 2002


City and State:

Unit: WPNS CO, 2ND BN, 1ST REGT, 1ST MARDIV FMF

Service or Relationship: Marine Veteran - Korea

Comments: How well I remember sailing aboard LST 1123 from the port of Kobe, Japan to the Port of Inchon to make the famous Inchon Invasion.

My Marine Corps "Sea and Air Travel--Embarkation slips" reads as follows:

"9Sept50 embarked on board LST 1123, at Kobe, Japan and departed there-from on 10 September 1950. Arrived and disembarked at Inchon, Korea, on 15 September 1950."

As a young Reservist who had never had the experience of going to Marine Corps Boot Camp, I did not know what "adventures I was to soon be confronted with." But I would soon learn, and very quickly so, all the lessons that Boot Camp would have taught me, plus much more!

In route to the port of Inchon from Kobe, I recall that the Marines in the Heavy Water Cooled Machine Gun Squad that I was assigned to was hunkered down in their sleeping bags, sleeping on the steel deck near the bow doors, and the AMTRACK we would depart in would be the third one to roll down the ramp.

I also remember how hot it was down below, and how the stench of vomit from those who were getting seasick was making me so sick I couldn't stand it.

Another Marine and myself (I cannot recall his name), decided to move our sleeping bags up into a forward gun turret. (Perhaps if he reads this, he will contact me.)

We thought we had made a smart move, until we were awaken by huge waves splashing over us in the middle of the night. We had ran into a typhoon, and the waves were breaking over the bow, and higher. Here we were, our sleeping bags were floating in water inside the gun turet, as the water could not drain out fast enough.

Soaking wet, tired, frightened, disgusted, and really upset by the whole thing, we made our way down to our Squad, to the place where the creaking, cracking and popping sounds of the AMTRACKS were straining at their chains that secured them to the decks below, as the ship rose, and fell, and crashed headon into the oncoming waves.

September the 15th, "D" Day. The bow doors of the LST opened wide, exposing all the sounds of war, and the smell of billowing, black smoke. I'll never forget the fright that rushed over me as the bow of our AMTRACK nosed down into the water, and a huge wave splashed up and over, and into the AMTRACK itself.

We were packed in like sardines with our weapons, field packs, 782 gear, ammo, and all the tools we would need to conduct an invasion. When the AMTRACK nosed deep into the water, I thought for sure we were headed for the bottom of the ocean. I recall hearing the Lieutenant yelling to the driver, "Gun it! Gun it! Gun it Damnit! Gun it!" Our driver was able to recover, and we recovered.

I remember the draft of the AMTRACK was so low, that water came up within a few feet of the open edge of the AMTRACK.

We set into motion to rendezvous with the other landing craft, and I recall watching the ripples on the water's surface as the Naval Guns blasted the shores. I recall first seeing the dark smoke rings, followed by the belching of orange flame and the ear splitting roar of the guns.

It was already late in the afternoon, and the dark clouds of smoke from ashore and int he air was quickly turning daylight into darkness, as we headed for "Red Beach."

After we landed at Inchon, and proceeded on toward Seoul, I heard that LST 1123 had not been able to get out of the area quick enough, as the tide had gone too quickly, and left the ship stranded "High and dry" in the mud.

I was a very young lad back in those days. I went to Korea as a boy, and became a man overnight. For some reason, combat in the United States Marine Corps will do that to you.

Semper Fi,

Clyde

Keywords: The Inchon Landing September 15 1950







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