USS Achernar (AKA-53)










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Entry: 92460
Subject: D DAY NORMANDY BEACH

Albert Muth wrote on December 28, 2015


City and State:

Unit: 2

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran

Comments: I am writing this for my father which is listed above. He is looking for anyone or information on his ship mates or men who crossed the Rhine into Oberwesel Germany. He was a gunner on a LCN Unit 2 that that took troops into Normandy Beach on D Day. His LCN was hit and he when inland with the army. Also was at the crossing of the Rhine shuttling troops across on LCN he was still the gunner on a LCN. Any information would be of interest to him. Yes he is still with us and doing fine.

I am trying to put together a history of these events for him to pass on as this is what he wishes. He has a good memory of events and I would like to add more information from those who experienced these events. I know this isn't related to the Korean War but maybe someone stayed on with USS ACHERNAR from this time period into the Korean War.

Keywords:



Entry: 90965
Subject: THE BRONZE STAR MEDAL WITH COMBAT V

Thomas E. (T.E.) Moore wrote on April 13, 2015


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Other

Comments: For skillful maneuvering of his ship in the Inchon Amphibious attack Sept. 1950, despite
hazards of extreme tidal and current conditions, and constant danger from floating enemy
mines, The Bronze Star Medal with Combat V was awarded to : Captain Crutchfield Adair,
USN, USS Achernar-AKA-53. Well Done AKA-53.

Keywords: Korean War --- Inchon Landing --- USS Achernar-AKA-53 --- Captain Crutchfield Adair,USN,
3-Korean War Battle Stars.



Entry: 88963
Subject: LOOKING FOR A SHIPMATE

Pam Allen wrote on May 24, 2014


City and State:

Unit: NAVY FIREMAN

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran

Comments: I am helping my Dad find a shipmate he served with on the USS Achernar during the Korean War. He is looking for a gentleman by the name of Richard (Dick) Phillips. Mr. Phillips lived in Madison Ohio. I would appreciate anyone who knows if Mr. Phillips is still alive would contact me via my email: tommysgirl1863@yahoo.com. My Dad's name is Jim Bush and he served I believe from 1951 to 1953 and Mr. Phillips would have had a little longer to serve.

Keywords: Personal friends. Both served on the USS Achernar during the Korean War.



Entry: 83629
Subject: MY 20 MO. DUTY ABOARD THE USS ACHERNAR, FROM 23 JAN 51 TO 25 AUG.52

Bill Staeb SR. wrote on July 14, 2012

Email Update Needed



City and State: SPOKANE WA

Unit: GUN GANG

Service or Relationship: Other

Comments:

Keywords:



Entry: 76209
Subject: USS ACHERMAR(AKA-53)

Frank Oliveri wrote on September 20, 2010


City and State: FOUNTAIN VALLEY CA

Unit: NAVAL PHOTOGRAPHIC CENTER, WASH.,DC

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran

Comments: I am trying to find out if the USS Achernar was the ship I was on in the
Summer of 1951. I was TDY as a photographer from the Naval
Photographic Center, Washington, D.C. Our AKA struck some heavy ice
which put a long gash on the starboard hull. The captain created a port
list by overhanging the LCVP's we had on board. A welder was sent
down to repair the hull. I photographed the entire trip from Norfolk, VA
to the North and back.

Another major event that occurred was an accident involving a
reservist. During general quarters drill, he fell 3 decks to the bottom of
one of the cargo bays cement deck. This occurred on our way back to
Norfolk, We had to pull into Goose Bay to transfer him to a sea plane
for transport to a hospital.

Again, I believe it was the Achernar which was the ship involved. Is
there anyone out there who was on board the ship I describe in the
summer of 1951?

I am trying to track down the photos I shot on that trip. The Defense
Department needs to know what ship I was on before they know where
to look in the Archives.

Keywords: Nanook 51 task force to Thule, Greenland and various weather stations
north of the arctic circle.



Entry: 74425
Subject: SHIPMATES/STORIES

Jennifer Fincher wrote on April 20, 2010


City and State: COLUMBUS MS

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: My grandfather, Boyd E. Pugh served on the Achernar in 1944 (I went to a ship's reunion on year with him). I don't know much about his service, but am trying to build on what little info I already have.

Is there anyone still doing the reunion's or the history of this tour that might send me info, or even know my grandpa???

I am looking for stories, history, and pictures, and letters.

Thank you in advance!!

Jennifer Fincher

Keywords: 1944



Entry: 52892
Subject: PICTURE OF AKA 53 USS ACHERNAR

George Panos wrote on August 27, 2005


City and State: CARLSBAD CA

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran

Comments: I MADE THE 1952 MED. CRUISE ON THE BALTIMORE AND TOOK MANY PICTURES. I HAVE JUST SUBMITTED ONE COLOR PHOTO OF YOUR SHIP TO YOUR WEBMASTER. IT'S A GREAT PHOTO AND I THINK EVERYONE WILL ENJOY IT WHEN IT GETS ON YOUR SITE. YOU WILL FIND MANY PHOTOS THAT I HAVE TAKEN FROM THE BALTIMORE.

THANK YOU FROM A 79 Y.O. SALT WHO HAS MANY GOOD MEMORIES OF HIS YEARS IN THE U.S. NAVY

MY BEST TO ALL AND MAY YOU HAVE RED SUNSETS AND CALM SEAS.

GEORGE PANOS EX QM2C

Keywords: USS TENNESSEE BB 43 SEPT. 1943-SEPT 1945 SM3/C HONORABLY DISCHARGED FEB. 1946
USS E.B.HALL APD 107 MAY 1951-APRIL 1952 SM3/C
USS BALTIMORE CA 68 MAY 1952-HONORABLY DISCHARGED MAY 1954 QM2C



Entry: 51371
Subject: THANKS JOE!

Walter Plywaski wrote on June 5, 2005

Email Update Needed



City and State: BOULDER CO

Unit: USAF AACS

Service or Relationship: Air Force Veteran

Comments: Thanks to G.I. Joe, we survived hell
D-Day holds special significance for the saved
By Walter Plywaski
June 5, 2005    Boulder Daily Camera
I don't know how else to honor or thank all the living and the dead vets and active-duty servicemen, regardless of how I feel about those who created for them and for us the Iraqi Mission Impossible for all the wrong reasons supportive of a manufactured Casus Belli!
Let me now praise non-famous men in grimy helmets and uniforms. They, in that unforgettable spring of 1945, brought life's early light into the barbed-wire hells of Germany.
These men, landing on Normandy's bloody beaches, poured freedom from the muzzles of their guns for my brother, all our concentration-camp comrades and me. The Americans and other Allies transformed us from those about to die like vermin to men preparing to live again. This is a belated thank-you note to these "GI Joes" who, like us, had also danced with death (though to a different tune). Thanks, Joe!
On this anniversary of D-Day in Europe, I humbly acknowledge those who pried open the black gate of SS hell with their bullet-shattered bones and lubricated its hinges with their blood. While there are still a few of you to read this belated thank-you for my life and that of my children who might never have been without you, I salute you with "L'Chaim" ... To Life!
In mid-April 1945, my brother and I, aged 15 and 16, escaped from the Dachau Karlsfeld sub-camp (about 10 miles from Munich) during an American shelling. The explosions brought out the true Aryan "heroism" of our SS-guard executioners, who ran from their towers and hid. This was the first time for us outside of barbed wire since May 1940 when we, as Polish Jews, were penned in for swift or slow slaughter.
We ran through a hole blasted in the barbed wire and crawled to reach an abandoned German anti-aircraft battery visible from the camp. There we feasted on still-hot corned-beef stew on a stove. Cans of DDT for our lice-ridden bodies, Wehrmacht boots and wool clothing, helmets and some weapons completed our booty. Since, by then, we could be mistaken for German soldiers, we kept our striped jackets and left to find the Allied lines. We were "taken prisoner" by Americans who took us back to their battalion and were identified by a sergeant who spoke Polish. After a shower, he got us the smallest possible American fatigue uniforms rolled up on arms and legs. A fantastic field kitchen breakfast of hot cereal with real milk and sugar completed our transformation into mini-GIs.
Who were these men just out of heavy combat, who found it seemingly necessary to share their language, thoughts, anger and their grief? I never knew most of their last names, but knew I was safe and free at last, free at last.
My brother and I came to them with our Polish names of Wlodzimierz and Wladyslaw and no English language. We parted from them some three weeks later as Bill and Walter, marching to Bremen so as to go to the United States. We were "drafted" on the way by a bunch of GIs fishing with hand grenades in a pond. A Polish American GI among them convinced us we needed some "R and R" with his outfit. Thus we became the mascots of the 278th Field Artillery Battalion, Battery C, commanded by Capt. John C. Van Arsdale of Minneapolis.
The day after we "joined" the 278th, that tall young captain gave a short speech at morning's formation. He said something like "These two boys lost their entire family. You can't give them back what they lost, but you can teach them all you know about and how to do things. Company dismissed!"
Capt. Van Arsdale, a chemical engineer, led our education. One of his men taught us algebra, another how to cut hair, another American history, another yet to press a uniform and so on. By the end of May, we were in cut-down American uniforms, stripes and unit shoulder patches inclusive, a strange sight at maybe five feet and 90 pounds. Battery C's men bivouacked on the Danube near the town of Donauworth. That miraculous summer we wandered along the river, swam, ate and grew. The men of Charlie Battery were our buddies, our fathers, our teachers and often our playmates. By the fall of 1945, the 278th was to return "stateside" and we had to part with those magnificent non-famous men.
My brother Bill and I now use the gift of life bought so dearly by so many to save so pitiably few out of the murdered millions. Yet the price paid by the GI dead saved other millions of Europe and America from the planned thousand years of slavery and death factories of the Third Reich.
Bill and I now live our concentration-camp fantasies of a good life in a humane new land. We hope against all hope that the price for lives such as ours shall "Never Again!" be required to be paid and that there shall "Never Again!" be such children as we were... yet there are and probably and sadly there will be again. Then once again lives will have to be bought by fear, wounds and deaths!
Walter Plywaski of Boulder was previously Wladyslaw Plywacki of the Lodz "ghetto," Auschwitz and Dachau death camps

Keywords: Thanks to G.I. Joe, we survived hell
D-Day holds special significance for the saved
By Walter Plywaski
June 5, 2005    Boulder Daily Camera
I don't know how else to honor or thank all the living and the dead vets and active-duty servicemen, regardless of how I feel about those who created for them and for us the Iraqi Mission Impossible for all the wrong reasons supportive of a manufactured Casus Belli!
Let me now praise non-famous men in grimy helmets and uniforms. They, in that unforgettable spring of 1945, brought life's early light into the barbed-wire hells of Germany.
These men, landing on Normandy's bloody beaches, poured freedom from the muzzles of their guns for my brother, all our concentration-camp comrades and me. The Americans and other Allies transformed us from those about to die like vermin to men preparing to live again. This is a belated thank-you note to these "GI Joes" who, like us, had also danced with death (though to a different tune). Thanks, Joe!
On this anniversary of D-Day in Europe, I humbly acknowledge those who pried open the black gate of SS hell with their bullet-shattered bones and lubricated its hinges with their blood. While there are still a few of you to read this belated thank-you for my life and that of my children who might never have been without you, I salute you with "L'Chaim" ... To Life!
In mid-April 1945, my brother and I, aged 15 and 16, escaped from the Dachau Karlsfeld sub-camp (about 10 miles from Munich) during an American shelling. The explosions brought out the true Aryan "heroism" of our SS-guard executioners, who ran from their towers and hid. This was the first time for us outside of barbed wire since May 1940 when we, as Polish Jews, were penned in for swift or slow slaughter.
We ran through a hole blasted in the barbed wire and crawled to reach an abandoned German anti-aircraft battery visible from the camp. There we feasted on still-hot corned-beef stew on a stove. Cans of DDT for our lice-ridden bodies, Wehrmacht boots and wool clothing, helmets and some weapons completed our booty. Since, by then, we could be mistaken for German soldiers, we kept our striped jackets and left to find the Allied lines. We were "taken prisoner" by Americans who took us back to their battalion and were identified by a sergeant who spoke Polish. After a shower, he got us the smallest possible American fatigue uniforms rolled up on arms and legs. A fantastic field kitchen breakfast of hot cereal with real milk and sugar completed our transformation into mini-GIs.
Who were these men just out of heavy combat, who found it seemingly necessary to share their language, thoughts, anger and their grief? I never knew most of their last names, but knew I was safe and free at last, free at last.
My brother and I came to them with our Polish names of Wlodzimierz and Wladyslaw and no English language. We parted from them some three weeks later as Bill and Walter, marching to Bremen so as to go to the United States. We were "drafted" on the way by a bunch of GIs fishing with hand grenades in a pond. A Polish American GI among them convinced us we needed some "R and R" with his outfit. Thus we became the mascots of the 278th Field Artillery Battalion, Battery C, commanded by Capt. John C. Van Arsdale of Minneapolis.
The day after we "joined" the 278th, that tall young captain gave a short speech at morning's formation. He said something like "These two boys lost their entire family. You can't give them back what they lost, but you can teach them all you know about and how to do things. Company dismissed!"
Capt. Van Arsdale, a chemical engineer, led our education. One of his men taught us algebra, another how to cut hair, another American history, another yet to press a uniform and so on. By the end of May, we were in cut-down American uniforms, stripes and unit shoulder patches inclusive, a strange sight at maybe five feet and 90 pounds. Battery C's men bivouacked on the Danube near the town of Donauworth. That miraculous summer we wandered along the river, swam, ate and grew. The men of Charlie Battery were our buddies, our fathers, our teachers and often our playmates. By the fall of 1945, the 278th was to return "stateside" and we had to part with those magnificent non-famous men.
My brother Bill and I now use the gift of life bought so dearly by so many to save so pitiably few out of the murdered millions. Yet the price paid by the GI dead saved other millions of Europe and America from the planned thousand years of slavery and death factories of the Third Reich.
Bill and I now live our concentration-camp fantasies of a good life in a humane new land. We hope against all hope that the price for lives such as ours shall "Never Again!" be required to be paid and that there shall "Never Again!" be such children as we were... yet there are and probably and sadly there will be again. Then once again lives will have to be bought by fear, wounds and deaths!
Walter Plywaski of Boulder was previously Wladyslaw Plywacki of the Lodz "ghetto," Auschwitz and Dachau death camps



Entry: 50950
Subject: LOOKING FOR SHIPMATES

Mervin Sexton wrote on May 18, 2005


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran - Korea

Comments: Looking for shipmates Walter H (W.H.) Burnham
and Richard Been 1950-1954. Originally from
Riverside, CA.

Keywords: Friends



Entry: 45308
Subject:

Bob Gilson wrote on August 19, 2004

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: My wife's father, Ray E. Malpass, was Captain of the USS Achernar in 1953. We would welcome any stories about him and about the Achernar's tour of duty at that time.

Thank you. Bob Gilson

Keywords:



Entry: 45237
Subject: MY LATE MOTHER-IN-LAW

Bill Campbell wrote on August 15, 2004


City and State: VA

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments:

Keywords: My beautiful mother-in-law, Mildred Maurice Hill on deck. Can't get any prettier than this! Well, I can't figure out how to attach the photo!!!!



Entry: 45236
Subject: MY LATE MOTHER-IN-LAW

Bill Campbell wrote on August 15, 2004


City and State: VA

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments:

Keywords: My beautiful mother-in-law, Mildred Maurice Hill on deck. Can't get any prettier than this!



Entry: 44203
Subject: ACHERNAR----'45 TO '47

Ted Ball wrote on July 2, 2004


City and State: ROSEVILLE CA

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran - Korea

Comments: Transferred onto ship as part of Seabees from
Port Hueneme, Ca in 1946 and made ship's
company and rose to Y/3c and was
discharged in l947 in Bremerton, Washington
The ship made a trip to Phillippines via Pearl
Harbor to off load the Seabees, then to
Shanghai, Tsingtao, and had to cancel the
Tiensen port because of the war , thence to
Japan-Yokosuka, and near Tokyo; two trips to
Pribilofs for seal skin and products; et cetera

Keywords:



Entry: 35352
Subject: JUST WONDERING

Marti Garner wrote on July 8, 2003


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Interested Person

Comments: I am trying to locate a Wayne Inman who was in the San Francisco Bay Area in the summer of 1950.
I believe he was in the navy.

Keywords:



Entry: 32276
Subject: LOOKING FOR LCDR DAVID P. KLAIN

Chris Miasnik wrote on February 22, 2003


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Friend of Veteran

Comments: David P. Klain, XO in 1952-3 on the Achernar, became a history teacher and guidance counselor at Wilson High School in Los Angeles in the 1960's and 70's. I, for one, benefitted from this great teacher. I know someone else who would also like to make contact. I'm at chrismiasnik@juno.com if you know his whereabouts. His last known residence was in Agoura, CA.

Keywords: USS Achernar LDCR, XO



Entry: 25748
Subject: SHIPMATE

Sanford (Sandy) Margalith wrote on May 25, 2002

Email Update Needed



City and State: SAN DIEGO CA

Unit: SMALL BOAT CREWS, USS CHERNAR, WWII

Service or Relationship: Interested Person

Comments: This site seems to be mostluy for Korea. How about WWII. Anything coming up with survivors?

Keywords: Searching for old friends if still alive: Bob Helmke, and Pentacost (can't remember first name),
Bob Sirowitz, Lt. Lewis



Entry: 20160
Subject: LOOKING FOR INFORMATION

Rudy Ault wrote on October 26, 2001

Email Update Needed



City and State: SHARON SPRINGS NY

Unit: B BTRY 2D BN/1ST ADA MP DET.

Service or Relationship: Friend of Veteran

Comments: I am seeking information for my wife and son about Gerard L. Beaudette (Died, 1981). Any information is more than we have now.
Thank You All.
Rudy, e-mail n2jzk@aol.com

Keywords: Beaudette, Gerard, L. MM2



Entry: 19456
Subject: LOOKING FOR SHIPMATES!

John (Gary) Rhodes wrote on September 16, 2001

Email Update Needed



City and State: AUBURN NY

Unit: ENGINEERING

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran - Korea

Comments: I found that there have been reunions and I would like to beincluded in a mailing about any future events.

Keywords: looking for personal friend Ken Wilson (Kenny). Served on the USS Achernar. Was from Marysville KS. We served together from 1953 out of Norfolk VA.to 1955.



Entry: 10325
Subject: 2001 USS ACHERNAR REUNION

Wayne Inman wrote on July 13, 2000

Email Update Needed



City and State: DALTON GA

Unit: USS ACHERNAR (AKA 53)

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran - Korea

Comments: The 2001 reunion will be in Biloxi, MS from Wednesday, April 25 to Sunday, April 29.

Keywords:







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