USS Mt McKinley (AGC-7)










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Entry: 96048
Subject: THANKS FOR KINDNESS

Stan Galloway wrote on July 26, 2018


City and State: CO

Unit:

Service or Relationship:

Comments: I was Log Room YN on McKinley in 49 and was transferred off when ship went into drydock at Vallejo. Ended up in 104th Seabees (later redesignated PhibCB-1) at Inchon landing, then Wonson, then was at Hungnam when my old ship steamed into port. With two Seabee friends (now looking like Marines), we caught a boat to the ship and asked for permission to shower. We were received like royalty. MAA got us clothing to wear while our greens were washed; we enjoyed first shower in over a month, and sit down to a real meal...we had lived on C-rations for a month. The kindness shown by my old ship was fantastic. When we returned to shore we were the envy of others in our small detachment because we smelled so good! We ended up NE of Hamhung where we relieved some marines who were needed further north. It would be another month or so before we had another hot shower and real meal. Thanks AGC-7.

Keywords:



Entry: 93888
Subject: MT MCKINLEY 1950-51

Patrick Hubbard wrote on October 22, 2016


City and State: SAN DIEGO CA

Unit: MT MCKINLEY

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran

Comments: I remember General MacArthur saying We'll be home by Christmas and oh how cold it was. We had inches of snow all over the decks and the OD gave the order to hose it all down because he knew salt water freezes at a lower temperature. Of course it did.

One side note-
As I was standing a watch on the upper deck and coming around a corner I bumped into the General with pipe in hand sitting on a deck chair. He looked at me and said Hows It going son? I said fine sir and left immediately.

Regards,
Patrick

Keywords: Landing at Inchon followed by the Evacuation at Hungnam.



Entry: 90882
Subject: BOB JETT

Robert Jett SR. wrote on March 29, 2015


City and State: IOWA CITY IA

Unit: OR DIVISION

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran

Comments: WOULD LIKE TO GET IN CONTACT WITH SOMEONE THAT SERVED ON THE SHIP FROM 52--56 IN THE OR DIVISION.

Keywords:



Entry: 90881
Subject: ROBERT(BOB)JETT

Robert Jett SR. wrote on March 29, 2015


City and State: IOWA CITY IA

Unit: OR DIVISION

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran

Comments: WOULD LIKE TO GET IN CONTACT WITH SOMEONE THAT SERVED ON THE SHIP FROM 52--56 IN THE OR DIVISION.

Keywords:



Entry: 80047
Subject: I DIVISION-1952-1954

Thomas Myers wrote on August 20, 2011


City and State: PEACHTREE CITY GA

Unit: MT. MCKINLEY

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran

Comments: I was assigned to the ship's Company PIO and was a contributor to the 1954 Cruise book. I would like to hear from anyone who was aboard at the same time. I still have my cruise book and will share photos with anyone who wants.

Keywords: Friends in the I Division, Shireman, Russell, Hurt, Tollar, Walton, Hensley, Anders, Pecoraro, Woodcock, Tool, Hubbard, Root, Lopez, Achenbach, Messer, Lt. S.A.McClaren and others.

 



Entry: 74312
Subject: SEARCHING FOR INFO ON MY UNCLE HOWARD STEWART

Becky Hudnall wrote on April 12, 2010


City and State: BATAVIA OH

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: Searching for information on my Uncle Howard Stewart who was on the USS Mt Mckinley. I think the years he served were around 1942 - 1948, I am not sure.

Keywords:



Entry: 73914
Subject: MY FATHER PAUL WILLIAM CAYLOR

Kathy Amirkhanian wrote on March 13, 2010


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: Looking for anyone that served with my father Paul
William Caylor. I do not know when he served, maybe '49
or '50. I just wanted to know more about him since he
passed away in 1970 and I did not have much info on his
naval service. Thanks for the help.

Keywords: uss mt. mckinley



Entry: 73782
Subject: URGENT; LOOKING FOR. RAY GARNER PER/MIKE.

Clark Eplin wrote on March 2, 2010


City and State: LIVE OAK FL

Unit: N A

Service or Relationship: Friend of Veteran

Comments: Thanks to any one with any info foe Ray Garner a good friend of a very good friend that means life its self to me Ed dosnt sound very well? had a brain bleed wants to speek with an dear old buddy from past while their is time Thanks for any help Clark

Keywords: MIKE___GC7 age apx. 75 Frien quite ILL wishes to meet up with long lost best buddy please reply thanks clark/ Re Edward Michelson (was called mike by Ray Garner)



Entry: 73501
Subject: COMPHIBGRUONE 1951-1953

John Hess wrote on February 10, 2010


City and State: SEVIERVILLE TN

Unit: COMPHIBGRUONE

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran

Comments: If you are still around. E-mail me. Jack

Keywords: Post, McCollum, Hopkins, Kamakura Garden Club, Gilbert,Kingson



Entry: 72561
Subject: USS COMSTOCK LSD 19

James A. Morgan wrote on November 27, 2009


City and State: LONG BEACH SHORE LINE MARINA CA

Unit: US NAVY

Service or Relationship: Other

Comments: would love to hear or find shipmates who served aboard this great ship
which is now in the hands of the taiwan navy she is now LSD 191



Keywords: USS COMSTOCK LSD 19



Entry: 69184
Subject: MT MCKINLEY AGC-7 1949-1951

Larry Cloteaux wrote on February 19, 2009


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran

Comments: I was a member of the crew during the time of the Inchon invasion (1949-1953) I have several pictures of the staff meetings and Korean Naval officers during the invasion. Change of command for Adm McInerney and Adm Withington for Com Phib Grp 3 and Adm Moore and Adm Whitington when the Eldarado AGC-11 changed command.

































ithington

Keywords: Pictures



Entry: 68386
Subject: THE ADMIRAL'S DAUGHTER

Roy Richardson wrote on December 25, 2008


City and State: HUNTINGTON BEACH CA

Unit: TASK FORCE 90 STAFF

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran

Comments: Late September 1952, in Korean War, I was ordered from AKA54 to AGC 7 and report directly to Admiral McInerney (SOPA) He Told me to find the port where the U.S.S. Comstock was, report to the commanding officer and bring the ship back to Yokosuka (flank speed at 6 knots a 2 week trip. He instructed me to read the Capt's Log Book. He would tell me why when I returned. The Bottom line: Caine Mutany in WWII was a true story. The Comstock's captain now being relieved was the "Captain Quegg" in Wolk's Book, Caine Mutany.
Adm. McInerney died in 1956. His daugher, Joan, I met while training in Coronado had introduced me to her dad as a football player from CAL. I have been trying to locate her to talk to her since it was really her earlier contacts that got me to his staff. Anyone knowing where she now is, please let me know. Last known her married name was Kelley
Thanks, Roy R.

Keywords: Rear Admiral Francis X. McInerney, U.S.S Comstock, LSD 19. Caine Mutany. Operational Readiness and Training Officer. AKA 54 U.S.S. Algol, and Coronado,CA



Entry: 67218
Subject: ENGINES

Sandy Nelson wrote on September 16, 2008

Email Update Needed



City and State: ROQUE BLUFFS ME

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Interested Person

Comments: I work in aquaculture. I have in our fleet a landing craft that we just pulled an engine from. It has a tag that says it was overhauled by the USS Mount McKinley boat shop in September 1958. I was 6 years old when it was done. I'm sure it's been done many times since, but I hope no one thinks the tag needs to be removed. I want to leave it where it is.

Keywords: Mt Mckinley - interesting comment.



Entry: 66342
Subject: MY GRANDFATHER?

Joshua Finch Thorpe wrote on July 3, 2008


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments:

Keywords: I've been looking for anyone who may have known my grandfather. I've never met him, but do have pics of him and of the Mt. McKinley. His name was Thomas Finch. I don't know when he was on the ship, but my grandmother talks about General Macarthur being on it as well. I would just like some dialogue about gramps. Thanks!



Entry: 62477
Subject: SERVED ABOARD AGC'S

Thomas Dupont wrote on October 1, 2007


City and State: PLEASANTON CA

Unit: TACRON 11

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran

Comments: I served in TACRON 11 from 1963 to early 1965. During this period I was assigned to serve aboard the USS Estes during Operation Red Cloud, on a Westpac Cruise aboard the USS El Dorado, deployed to the South China Sea after during the Tonkin Gulf Crisis in 1964. The El Dorado was relieved by the USS Mt. McKinley and we went aboard the Mt.McKinley until December 1964.

Keywords: TACRON 11



Entry: 54665
Subject: KOREAN SERVICE 1951-1953

Clarence Beddome wrote on December 14, 2005


City and State: SEDONA AZ

Unit: COMPHIBGRU-3

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran

Comments: Some memories: Surviving a serious typhoon in the Yellow Sea in that old blessed bucket of bolts skippered by Captain R. N. Norgard. Boy did I appreaciate the Old Man after he brought us through that ugly scene, Heavy green water tore off our forward firepumps, some of the Admiral's automobiles that didn't get stowed in the auto hold, and having to restore some damge control shoring. I don't EVER want to see green water higher than the superstructure again.

Also, how freezing cold it was in Inchon during the winter.
I wound up with 2 stars on the Korean Service Medal and finally received a Korean War Service Medal issued by Korea on the 50th Anniveersary of the korean War.
I participated in the planning of the Soc cho Ri landing (Kojo - Wonsan)
Our Marines went over the side via cargo nets in bad water - our little pop-gun 3"50 banging away alongside the "real" men-o-war ships' such as the USS Helena's long gun activities.

Keywords: ComPhibGru-Three Radm Frederic S. Withington
KOJO (Wonsan)
Inchon
Pusan



Entry: 52096
Subject: USS MOUNT MCKINLEY ASSOCIATION

Dennis Pilny wrote on July 18, 2005

Email Update Needed



City and State: MIDDLEBURG HTS. OH

Unit: USS MT MCKINLEY

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran

Comments: For all of you looking for friends and conrades from the USS Mount McKinley, visit the USS Mount McKinley Association web pages. There is a lot of information about this ship and our 500 active members and the over 1000 that have been members.
http:/www.ussmtmckinley.com

Keywords: USS Mount McKinley AGC7/LCC-7



Entry: 51207
Subject: SEARCH FOR FATHER

James Whelan JR. wrote on May 30, 2005

Email Update Needed



City and State: COLUMBIA MD

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran

Comments:

Keywords:



Entry: 49754
Subject: ATOMIC BLAST

Stephie Bean wrote on March 24, 2005

Email Update Needed



City and State: WEST PALM BEACH FL

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: My grandfather, A.L. "Sonny" Bean, was one of the first privates to see the first atomic blast of the Korean War...there was an article in the Galax Gazette about this event with his picture on the front page in April of 1953! If possible I would like information on how to see pictures or that article on line..if anyone could help...please email me at the above email address!
Thanks!

Keywords: A.L. "Sonny" Bean



Entry: 49376
Subject: SERVED AS QMS 1943 1946

Omer Goodwin wrote on March 6, 2005

Email Update Needed



City and State: MARYSVILLE CA

Unit: FLAG STAFF W/ADM FLETCHER - KINCADE - NOBLE

Service or Relationship: -

Comments: We had over 78 men in the Flag Group every thing from yoeman to a cook and 5 cpo's commander Scott and myself were wounded with the same 20
shell fragment during the landings in Lateye gulf
Scott filled out the paper work sometimes i wish i had too.just thought that maybe som of us may still be alive most of the raddiod and signalmen
came from Great Lakes Traning Center

755-10-04 Omer Goodwin SM2

Keywords: COMPACPHIB GROUP #1 STARTED IN ISLLANDS ODD NEW GUINEA AND FINISHED WITH BARNEO LANDINGS SUMMER 46
FINISHED MY TOUR AT THE PHIB BASE IN SAN DIEGO



Entry: 47699
Subject: BM (SN) EDWARD J. CARROLL

Maria Carroll wrote on December 25, 2004


City and State: IMPERIAL BEACH CA

Unit: UDT UNITS

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: I am seeking anyone who knew my late father. I just received his service record, and know that he was on this ship. I am doing a scrapbook in his memory for my daughter so that she can read up on her grandfather, and see what a wonderful man he was, and how he helped shape history the way it is today. If anyone can help, please contact me at nadogirl_2000@yahoo.com. Thank you.

Keywords: Father also aka: Guinni or Diego. He was with UDT teams almost his entire time in the navy.



Entry: 44907
Subject: RADIOMAN ON MIGHTY MAC 1945

Ken Lassila wrote on July 31, 2004


City and State: MOHAWK MI

Unit: RADIOMAN

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran - Korea

Comments: Got on the ship from Maui and made the trip to Japan, returned to the states in December. During leave, the ship left on emergency orders, I'm still looking for my gear...

Keywords: spent the Korean conflict in Washington DC at BEP Relay



Entry: 41540
Subject: REUION

Ruben Pulliam wrote on March 6, 2004

Email Update Needed



City and State: LOUISVILLE KY

Unit: ELECTRICIAN MOUNT MCKINLEY 55/60

Service or Relationship: Interested Person

Comments: Served aboard Mt. Mckinley 1957 to 1960

Keywords:



Entry: 40913
Subject: INCHON/WONSON/HUNGNAM

James Caldwell wrote on February 15, 2004


City and State: SEGUIN TX

Unit: MT MCKINLEY AGC-7

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran - Korea

Comments: Came to Korea on board the USS Pickaway APA 222
Landed the Marines at Pusan then went to Japan to board the Mt McKinley, Went to Korea with MacArthur on board made the Inchon landing, assigned to a LCVP to carry wounded to the Hospital ship from the beach at Inchon, then made Wonson, returned to Japan for a while and returned to Korea for the Hungnam evacuation, then transfered to Naval Beach Group one at Camp McGill japan, discharged Nov 1951 at Treasure Island CA.
Jim Caldwell HM3

Keywords:



Entry: 39659
Subject: CHAPLAIN'S ASSISTANT

Richard Davis wrote on January 2, 2004

Email Update Needed



City and State: CLEVELAND TN

Unit: PERSONEL DIV.

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran - Korea

Comments: Would like to hear from anyone who served during 1951 - 1953. I boarded this great ship 1951 fresh out of boot camp at Vellejo, California. This was a very innteresting time in my life. I can recall many faces that I cannot put a name with. It would be interesting to renew an acquaintance that I new during this time.
I served as chaplain's assistant during most of this time, my office was in the ship's library or lounge and was in charge of daily devotionals oveer the ship's intercom my tour of duty ended in 1953 when I was transferred to SubGroup II at National City, San Diege,calif.
I would like to say it was an honor to have served on board. richrd e. davis

Keywords: friends: Charles Seal of Mississippi;Kenneth Merritt, Thomas Landeta of Flagstaff, Az; Pat Wheeler, NC



Entry: 39097
Subject: FATHER SERVED FROM 1949-51

Michael Welch wrote on December 11, 2003

Email Update Needed



City and State: HAVRE MT

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments: I am looking for information, individual and crew pictures of My father,his ship and mates. He recently passed away (11-5-03) and I would like to know about his service and duty.
He was a Tilleman 3rd Class. I think served as a UDT Specialist. Please anyone with info. Thank you

Keywords:



Entry: 35936
Subject: LOOKING FOR SHIPMATES

Ernie Wellman wrote on July 30, 2003

Email Update Needed



City and State: LEESBURG FL

Unit: DECK DIVISION, OPERATIONS DIVISION

Service or Relationship: -

Comments: looking for shipmates, served on Mt. Mac from 1960 to 1963, as yoeman in Deck division and operations division, and admin division.

Keywords:



Entry: 30827
Subject: THANKS, MT. MCKINLEY

Melvin (Mel) Moore wrote on December 31, 2002


City and State: FL

Unit: 71ST SIG SVC BTN, GHQ

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments: Every December 24 I remember how I was evacuated off the beach in Hungnam, North Korea by a motor whaleboat from the Mt. McKinley. The boat had to be chipped/scraped every couple of trips because it was icing up so badly. The crew treated us very nice, gave us some clothes, hot chow, etc. I stayed on board until the ship tied up in Japan a week later and I rejoined my unit in Tokyo.

Keywords:



Entry: 29983
Subject: LOOKING FOR SHIPMATES

Samuel Morrie Yucht wrote on November 28, 2002

Email Update Needed



City and State: FLINT MI

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran - Korea

Comments: Evaluated Hungnam

Keywords:



Entry: 29811
Subject: AGC7

Donald Harris wrote on November 22, 2002


City and State: TYLER TX

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran - Korea

Comments: wonder if anyone else was on the mckinley during the h bomb test in l955. the test was anawetok or something like that. we were in kwaj some. will be good to hear from someone there at the time. don harris

Keywords:



Entry: 24288
Subject: TACRON ONE

Norman (Norm) Steinkamp wrote on March 26, 2002

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran - Korea

Comments: I'm looking for other members of Tacron One that were aboard the MtMcKinley in 1950 and 1951. We were aboard during the Incon invasion and directed air support for the Marines. The whole invasion was directed from the MtMcKinley. This included Naval gunfire, air support, keeping track of the landing craft etc. All this was directed from one area of the ship called the CIC. Combat Information Center. My job was keeping track of incoming and out going aircraft on a status board. I'd like to hear from any other members of Tacron that were there during the McKinley's stay in Korea from 1950 to 1952.
I was a radioman 3rd class at the time.

Keywords: USS MtMcKinley



Entry: 19479
Subject: 1950-53 SIGNALMEN OR COMMUNICATIONS DIV

Pete Bertram wrote on September 18, 2001


City and State: ABSAROKEE MT

Unit: USS UNION,AKA 106, USS MTMCKINLEY WW2. USS MOUNTRA

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran - Korea

Comments: Trying to find some of my old shipmates.

Keywords: looking for any signalmen or communications div. men, USS Mountrail APA 213, also signalmen on Uss MtMckinley AGC 7. Nov 1950 t0 sept 1953.



Entry: 17779
Subject: ABOARD THE MOUNT MCKINLEY 1964-65

Steve Schermerhorn wrote on July 6, 2001

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Interested Person

Comments: Navy Veteran not of the Korean War Era (1961-1965). Did a Wespac cruise as a ETR3/2 on Mt. Mac. 1964-65, was aboard during the first landing of the 9th Marines at Danang, Vietnam also at Hue. Crossed the Equator on the same cruise plus visited several ports in different countries. Our supposedly 6 month deployment turned into a 9 month deployment. See pops previous message and consider joing the USS MOUNT McKINLEY Association and attending thier annual reunions. Also I am the current ships storekeeper for that organization - We have Hats, Shirts, patches and etc. See more at (http://www.ussmtmckinley.com)

Keywords:



Entry: 16127
Subject: USS MOUNT MCKINLEY ASSOCIATION

Dennis Pilny wrote on April 25, 2001

Email Update Needed



City and State: NORTH ROYALTON OH

Unit: USS MOUNT MCKINLEY

Service or Relationship: Interested Person

Comments: Anyone looking for information concerning the USS Mount McKinley and all staffs associated with her can find it at www.ussmtmckinley.com , this is the web site for the USS Mount McKinley Association. We have over 450 active members and a total membership of over 850. We have all services in our association, only requirement is that you served on the Mt Mac. Look us up!

Keywords: USS Mount McKInley AGC-7



Entry: 13163
Subject: STAFF MEDICAL OFFICER ONBOARD THE USS MOUNT MCKINLEY

Ernest Zinke wrote on November 22, 2000


City and State: LAKEPORT CA

Unit: AMPHIBIOUS GROUP

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran - Korea

Comments: Pusan Harbor, South Korea

In the Korean war I was stationed aboard the Mt. McKinley, the flagship for Amphibious Forces Pacific.
The North Koreans had decided to occupy all of Korea in defiance of the World War II peace accords. General MacArthur had landed at Inchon and fought his way down to Pusan at the south end of the Korean Peninsula. We landed at the Pusan Harbor while it was occupied, and stayed there while it was liberated.

The Rue’s Orphanage

We were docked at Pusan. Several sailors, returning from a night on the town, were met by a little boy who said, “Sirs, I’m hungry!” They took him aboard, fed him, put him to bed and brought him to breakfast the next morning. He was a little orphan boy who had been cared for by an army unit, but it had shipped out. Now he was aboard ship, so what should be done with him? The crew named him Jimmie and kept him on the ship for several weeks, even when we sailed for Inchon Harbor. He became very popular with the crew. At night when the crew watched movies Jimmie would always be the one to say, “Attention on deck!” whenever the admiral came down to see the movies. Then he would climb up on the Admiral’s lap and watch the movies from this perch.
Various crewmen were assigned to watch him, but one day he disappeared and the crew found him in the engine room. We knew we had to get him off the ship. I knew about an orphanage which had been established by Dr. George Rue and his wife, Grace.Rue. I suggested that possibility.

Dr. Rue was a Loma Linda graduate and had done missionary service in a mission hospital just outside Seoul, Korea for many years. The communists had moved in and taken over the hospital. Dr. Rue had stayed in Korea and set up an office in Pusan during the communist occupation. When the communists were driven out, the Rues moved back into the hospital. Grace Rue started the orphanage in the basement.

The next time we landed at Inchon I was given a jeep, a Marine driver, some groceries and Jimmie. A line officer from the ships staff named Don Seaman was a friend of mine and he went with me. We took Jimmie to the orphanage. I found Grace Rue in her office in the basement. I told her I had Jimmie and some supplies. She wanted the supplies put in the store room. Don and I carried the supplies in there and Don saw how little there was in the supply room. When he comment to Grace about this she told him, “I’ve never had to put these kids to bed hungry yet.” Don was impressed. We left.

A month or so later, here came a big box addressed to Amphibious Forces Pacific as a high priority item. The admiral’s staff opened it and found it was filled with food concentrates, vitamins, etc. The officer said that it looked like Don Seaman, who was now on the staff of Navy Intelligence in Washington D.C., had sent this to me.

I got another jeep and driver, and went ashore with this big box to take it to the Rue’s orphanage. After we got on the road we came to a roadblock with a customs office. They stopped us and wanted us to pay duty on the box of supplies. They wouldn’t let us go through. I went back to the Marine security people in that area and told them the story. They sent a second jeep with an armed guard and they told the custom agent, We’re going through. There was no further argument. After we were through, the armed guard left, but we were in the clear.

We went to the orphanage and made the delivery. We saw Jimmie and he had fit right in. Grace Rue was very appreciative. She told us more about her work there. We returned to the ship, but stayed in touch with the Rue’s by phone and through occasional visits.

One time the Mount McKinley was in Sasabo, and the supply officer said, “We have weevils in the flour, I’ll have to survey it.” Tons of flour were involved. The executive officer said it had to be destroyed. I told the supply officer I’d like to get it to the Rue’s orphanage.

I found out that a squadron of LST’s was detailed to go up to Inchon. I contacted the Commodore, told him about the orphanage and the flour with weevils and that the supply officer said it should be destroyed. The LST officer said to just stack it up on the pier and the LST crew would get it and deliver it to the Orphanage. Later I got a letter from Grace Rue telling how the commodore himself had delivered the flour to the orphanage and how welcomed it was. They could always use it as barter for other supplies. The many orphanages had an exchange program between them. If the Rue’s got a ham they could exchange it for powdered milk.

Later I told the Executive Officer what had been done with the flour. But he got mad and said, “I ordered that flour destroyed!” I just turned my heels on him and left. But later I heard that the Executive Officer really came down hard on the Supply Officer for not having destroyed the flour as ordered.

Years later I was in the San Diego Naval Hospital and met the Supply Officer in civilian clothes. He told me that the Executive Officer was very vindictive, gave him a bad fitness report, so he had gotten out of the Navy over that incident.

One time, when I was on leave back in the United States, I learned that there was a program run by the Surplus Commodity Corporation which let people purchase surplus food from the government for charities. Dr. Glenn McCaffrey was a Loma Linda surgeon in Vista and my neighbor. He and I teamed up to buy a cargo container of assorted supplies and ship it to the Rue’s Orphanage through civilian shipping. We got a letter from the Rue’s telling us that they received the supplies and how much they appreciated it.

The Channel at the Inchon Harbor

MacArthur also fought his way across Korea from Inchon Harbor and cut Korea in two. The Mount McKinley left Pusan Harbor and went to Inchon Harbor.

The channel at Inchon was very dangerous. Landing craft going back and forth from ship to shore would get lost, wash downstream and out to sea, or they would wash up on an island. Several of the landing craft from the Mount McKinley were lost this way.

On the front lines in North Korea

As the chief Naval Medical Officer at Inchon I set up the arrangement for the medical care of the seriously wounded troops who were flown out to ships for specialized care. I set up six LST’s for specialized care in one or another medical specialty – for orthopedic injuries, abdominal injuries, infections, pneumonia, psychiatric, etc. Later, we got hospital ships. After they took over, the LST’s were released.

Then I was sent to the front lines to observe the American medical care of our troops at the battle front. I was taken in by helicopter from the Mount McKinley.

The U.S. Army was well inside the North Korean territory. I was at a platoon or company headquarters at the front line when it was about 60 miles north of Seoul. Korean forces were on either side of us and moved in and out. I shared tents with two other Loma Linda doctors. I was to observe the care the troops were getting.

I could see the front lines a few hundred yards away. The troops were dug in, but the Koreans would occasionally attack. Raids were usually conducted at night. I watched the wounded soldiers brought in and be treated, then taken by ambulance or later air-evac planes to the hospital ships. I spent about a week there. I saw several hundred wounded soldiers treated. Occasionally, I helped treat a few patients.

By the time I was to return to the Mount McKinley, the weather had turned bad, so I had to go back by jeep at night. Two jeeps started out, but I never saw the other jeep again and I don’t know if it ever made it back or not.

This was the closest I ever got to actual ground fighting, and I was really glad to get back to my warm stateroom on the Mount McKinley.

Ground Zero at the A-Bomb Test Site

General Douglas MacArthur was considering dropping an atomic bomb on the Chinese invaders in Korea. So the Admiral in Korea gave me orders to go Mercury, Nevada to learn about Atomic Bombs at the test site. When I checked in I was told that I wasn’t cleared for atomic information. I told them, “Then I’ll leave and go right back to Korea.” They said, “Wait a minute.” and immediately cleared me.

I made a tour of the test site before the blast, including ground zero and various stations set up at 500 yard intervals. Animals had been tied to stakes at each station, including goats and other farm animals. Cottages had been built and furnished at other specified intervals.

Marines were going to be stationed in a trench at a pretty close range, and I had volunteered to be there with them. Then I found out that when the countdown began, the marines would lie flat on the ground in a six foot deep trench until after the blast had passed. They would then be airlifted out and checked to see what amount of radiation they had absorbed. It was believed that the ground would protect them from the radiation. After learning this, I declined to stay with the marines,
and went instead to watch the bomb explosion from the chairs on top of a hill, seven miles away from ground zero.

After the blast we were sent in with geiger counters to take radiation measurements starting at the seven mile area and then going into the closer locations in a straight line to ground zero. We stopped at each station and cottage to take radiation measurements and record our observations in a log.

We could see devastation all around. The animals were dead. The vegetation was seared and burned. We saw the damaged houses. The damage got worse as we progressed in, and the closest house was totally demolished.

I recorded how the geiger counter readings slowly increased as we got closer to ground zero. We continued in. Suddenly, I noticed the geiger counter shoot way up. I saw that the sand around us was glazed and porceillinized (black). I saw a crumpled heap and realized that we were at the collapsed bomb tower at ground zero. I told the driver to turn around and get out of there as fast as he could.

We had been exposed to a hefty dose of radiation, so we had to get decontaminated. We went to bathhouses back up on the hill and went into the scrub rooms and started scrubbing. We had readings taken of us periodically. I noticed that the high readings were mainly around my ears, armpits, groin and fingernails. We went in and out of the shower and scrubbed repeatedly for the rest of the afternoon until the geiger counters said I was safely decontaminated. My driver did the same thing, along with others that were coming in from different sectors.

I turned in my report and drove home to Riverside. Then I went back to Korea.

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Entry: 13020
Subject: SEARCHING FORGC7 REUNION GROUP

Scott Davis wrote on November 16, 2000

Email Update Needed



City and State: STPAUL MN

Unit: DECK DIVISION

Service or Relationship: -

Comments: i'm looking for the site containing info on the annual reunion. i was onboard from 60-63 and was first then second division officer

Keywords: cuban missle crisis, flag phibron 2



Entry: 12663
Subject: LOOKING FOR SHIPMATES

David Freedman wrote on November 1, 2000

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran - Korea

Comments: I boarded the McKinley in Mare Island during the retrofit, and remained ship's company until late '54 when I was transferred ashore for discharge. I was attached to the electronics division.

Keywords: Aboard AGC-7 from 1952-1954



Entry: 11737
Subject: 8TH ARMY ATTACHED TO MT MCKINLEY

Harry Brown wrote on September 14, 2000

Email Update Needed



City and State: SCHENECTADY NY

Unit: 35THREGT. 25TH INF DIV

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments: Irony. I was attached to USS Mt. McKinley in or around May 1950 and worked in capacity of logistics. My regt. commander, Colonel Fisher, and all the other higher brass made their home on that beautiful ship at that time. I prepared all the working orders for the amphibious training while aboard ship. When my tenure ended the Korean War broke out and my outfit was one of the first to enter that war. Many of my outfit were part of task force smith, the first to engage the enemy. After the Inchon invasion we from the puson perimeter were raced northward to engage the remnants of the North Korean Army. However, we ran into the Chinese on 11/26/50 and out of 215 men only 26 survived the battle. I spent 3 years in a Chinese prison camp. My memory of the flag ship is still with me today and its historic role in that war will never leave me.

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Entry: 9352
Subject: SERVED ABOARD MT MCKINLEY

Merle Borkowski wrote on June 13, 2000

Email Update Needed



City and State: ELLIOTT IA

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Navy Veteran - Korea

Comments: I hope this page isn't just for those that died in the War, if so put on different list.

Keywords: Was on Mt. McKinley in 1947.



Entry: 4662
Subject: 1953

John Greenwood wrote on November 10, 1999

Email Update Needed



City and State: DALLAS TX

Unit: USS MT. MCKINLEY

Service or Relationship: Navy

Comments: I am very impressed and pleased that you are doing this. I read about the project in today's Dallas Morning News. I was able to find info about someone that I knew who was killed in Korea in 1951. I will help,

Keywords: I served on the USS Mount McKinley, GC7 in
Korea from late 1953 until late 1954.



Entry: 3825
Subject: TACRON -1

William (Bill) Powell wrote on October 31, 1999

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit: NAVY

Service or Relationship: Navy

Comments: You might be interested in this account of my time on the Mighty Mac during the Korean War. I wrote it for the historical committee of the Mt McKinley Association. I was an Electronic Technician Second Class (ET2) assigned to Tactical Air Control Squadron One (TACRON 1).

Best regards, Bill Powell


"During 1949 and the early part of 1950, TACRON One participated in various operations with AGC's off San Clemente Island. In May, 1950 we again boarded the Mighty Mac for a planned 12-week cruise to Japan to train MacArthur's troops in amphibious operations. It was while we were on those exercises that the North Koreans invaded South Korean. (To this day I do not understand why North Korea picked that time to invade the South while all those Amphibious Forces with carriers, cruisers, destroyers, AKAs, APA's and The Mt. McKinley were in the area.) The exercises were cancelled, we returned to Yokusuka to load real ammunition and then headed for Pusan.

I am not sure of the exact dates, but to the best of my knowledge I will try to describe some of my experiences from June 1950 to June 1951 when we returned to Sad Diego. Hopefully you already have more exact details of the activities of the Mt. McKinley during that time. I remember in the early days in Pusan seeing my first airplane turn and head for us. Fortunately one of TACRON officers, who were all pilots, recognized it as one of ours and the Mighty Mac did not open fire. After helping to establish the perimeter at Pusan we spent several weeks tied up in Tokyo planning the Inchon landing. I remember being woken up about 0200 one morning to help collate and staple the Operations Plan which had been printed on board. When we left Tokyo for Inchon Maggie Higgins, a female correspondent, came aboard and a Life photographer took a picture of our departure. I was able to recognize myself in that picture.

Our departure from Tokyo was delayed for a bit because we were stuck in the mud of the harbor and tugs could not pull us free. Some said that it was not mud we were stuck in but the many coffee grounds that had been dumped over board during the several weeks that we were tied up in Tokyo. I will never forget that experience. The word was passed, "All hands, lay to on the starboard side." The next word was, "All hands lay to on the port side." Shifting the weight did no good. The next word was, "All hands, lay out on the dock." Lightening the weight did no good either so the next word was, "All hands on the dock push on the side of the ship." With our pushing and the tugs pulling the Mighty Mac broke loose from the coffee grounds and inched her way forward. It must have been the coffee grounds directly under us because the ship just moved down the dock a little ways, we all reboarded and we were on our way. What a way for the amphibious forces flag ship to start on the "most daring amphibious landing of all time."

On the way to Inchon we stopped in Sasebo to pick up MacArthur and other top brass. Going through the straight that night under darken ship conditions we rammed and sank a Japanese sampan. I think that we had three collisions at sea during the Korean War. While we were refueling under way we got too close to the tanker and knocked one of the boat booms loose. The skipper, Capt. Printup (spelling?), was all regulations. We had inspection every Saturday morning, war or no war, and we always went to quarters to pay honors to passing ships. Coming into Yokosuka one time we were at quarters with "Attention to port" when we side swiped a carrier on our starboard side. I think that it was the Bonne Homme Richard.

About a week after the landing at Inchon a couple other guys from the squadron and I were able to go ashore for an afternoon of sightseeing. What a mess. I don't understand how people could have lived under those conditions and survive the destruction caused by the bombardment. After Inchon we had a great Thanksgiving and were looking forward to going home soon because the war was over, or so we thought. After the Chinese struck, we moved to Hungnam and then to Wonsan to help evacuate the Marines. It was cold that December and I was ever so grateful to be in the Navy with a warm bunk and hot food instead of a Marine over on that snowing and icy beach. Before the port at Hungnam was blown up I was sent ashore to insure that all of the radio equipment was removed from an abandoned Corsair. It had been, so my trip was unnecessary but at least I had the experience of being one of the last to leave the port.

No one was very cheerful on the Mt. McKinley the Christmas Eve of 1950 as we left Wonsan but we made the most of it and were grateful that most of the Marines had made it out OK. We did sing a few Christmas Carols but with not much enthusiasm. I do not remember much activity after that until we went back to San Diego in June. I think that we went back and forth between Japan and Korea a couple of times but I am not sure. I do remember, however, that we did pull into Nagasaki for a few days of sightseeing and R and R. Some of our officers and men were able to go on a two day R and R to Unzen, a hot springs resort in the mountains near Nagasaki. And seeing the destruction in Nagasaki caused by the bomb, just five years earlier, was impressive. I remember seeing the brick and stone wall of a church moved over about five inches from its foundation. But all in all life seemed to be back to normal after all of the radiation and destruction.

After a stop in Honolulu, the Mt. McKinley arrived back in San Diego in June, 1951. The original twelve week training cruise had turned into a thirteen month war cruise. All on board were very proud when the long going-home banner was unfurled as we passed Point Loma into San Diego harbor and tied up at North Island."

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