108th Quartermaster Mobile Bakery Company


Photo by Hal Barker












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Entry: 76516
Subject: 108TH Q.M BAKERY COMPANY

Nancy Somers wrote on October 25, 2010


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Other

Comments:

Keywords: I came across a copy of a thanksgiving minue the front has Tthanksgiving written in a v shape under that is 19-43 108th Q.M. Bakery Co. A.P.O. 700 New York, N.Y. also has North Africa on front. Inside it has Personnel listed on 7 pages. I don't know where it came from. I would love to give it to anyone interested. If interested email me.



Entry: 40717
Subject: 108TH MOBILE BAKERY COMPANY

Joe Morichetti wrote on February 9, 2004


City and State: BURLINGTON NJ

Unit: 108TH MOBILE BAKERY COMPANY

Service or Relationship: Family Member

Comments:

Keywords: 108th Mobile Bakery Company



Entry: 34226
Subject: 108TH QM BAKERY CO. (MOBILE)

Ernest Peterson wrote on May 17, 2003

Email Update Needed



City and State:

Unit: 108TH QM BAKERY CO. (MOBILE)

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments: I became a member of the 108th in December 1948 in Camp Lee, VA. We moved to Ft. Bragg, NC in January or February 1949 along with the 899th Laundry Company.
In August 1950 we arrived in Pusan after a 14 day crossing on the General C.C. Ballou. Our first night was on the western edge of Pusan where we could see the flashes from fighting in the area of Masan. We were issued three rounds of ammo.
When our equipment arrived we were tented in the city as one company unit. Each of our three platoons was organized to operate autonomously and soon did. The 1st and 2nd heading north as we broke out of the perimeter. The 3rd platoon, of which I was a member, remained in Pusan until late Fall 1950.
Our truck convoy, pulling oven trailers and other mobile equipment was still finding it's way north when we met the other two platoons coming south at Sariwon, NK. Seems, the Chinese "volunteers" were coming behind them.
I volunteered to drive one of the 2 1/2's pulling an oven trailer as we traveled through the night going south. There were many other vehicles on the road and the dust was so thick that headlights would not penetrate; just followed the tail lights of the vehicle ahead. At one point we stopped and were told there was a road block. I thought the worse and grabbed my carbine and a NK "burp" gun I had commandeered. Turned out the road block was just that; a low-boy had dumped some girders on the road.
A couple nights later we quartered in an abandoned brewery where we filled the water cans with green beer.
We eventually ended up in Taegu where we spent Christmas before going to Kyong Ju where we set up our equipment and went to work.
The third platoon went to Chechon in Feb. The first day there we set up near the rail yard when a huge explosion of an ammunition train got our attention. I just happened to be looking in the right direction and saw the first white flash, then the noise and the shock wave. We jumped in our freshly dug trenches and waited it out for the next 9 to 10 hours. The next day we walked the tracks to look for unexploded shells.
Not to long after that the NK which had been pushing hard at Wonju made an end run toward Chechon. We had tanks lined along the road and watched the napalming in the hills. I was on duty to handle any communications one night at the supply dump when a small group of GI's came in claiming they had been left with their quad 50 mounted half-track while in an exposed position in the hills. We talked as our artillery seemed to tumble through the air over our heads.
Another night I was on guard duty along the road when a ROK Inf. unit came marching in. Not a sound was heard except their slogging as they went by me. After they passed a Lt. from a Signal Co. across the road came over and let me have it for not stopping them as they could have been NK. Oh, yeah.
When the company headquarters caught up with us in Chechon, I became the company clerk. I also served as the personnel clerk for a while before returning to the Company as clerk in Chunchon in late summer/early fall 1951.
I was detailed to write the unit history for the 108th from it's arrival in Pusan to the current time in Chunchon. I wish I knew how to find that history and read it now!
I understand that the 108th is no more. In Korea we earned 5 campaign stars and a Meritorious Unit Commendation.
We had various officers lead us: Capt. Thomas J. Ryan, Lt. Squyers, Lt. Cline, Lt. (later Capt.) Edgar Fleury, Lt. Marquardt (later Capt.) and a Capt. whose name I don't recall but was a good guy.
We also had some top rate NCO's: Louis Hill, Morris Glickman amongst others. MSGT Hughes was our 1st Sgt. for much of the time; Lou Hill took his place. Sgt. Kidd was our motor pool Sgt.
Ernie (Pete) Peterson

Keywords: Korea: August 1950 - February 1952



Entry: 9838
Subject: COMPANY COMMANDER- 1ST HALF-1952

Bill Marquardt wrote on June 26, 2000


City and State: WESTMINSTER CA

Unit:

Service or Relationship: Army Veteran - Korea

Comments:

Keywords:







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