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Infantry Regiment







32nd Infantry Regiment


766 Messages

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Entry: 75367
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
32ND INF. REG. HQ RADIO OPERATOR 1952-53

DAVE (HUCKO) SHUTTERS wrote on July 7, 2010


City and State: SWANTON OH

Unit: 32ND INF. REG. HQ-HQ RADIO OPERATOR

Service or Relationship: ARMY VETERAN

Comments: Looking to touch base with any of my old buddies. Ernie McNeil, Lenny Metras, Paul Sunic, McGrath, Peterson, etc.
Call or e mail.


Keywords: My nickname was HUCKO. Most of the guys thought that was my real name. Our C.O. was Capt. Totter.


Entry: 75290
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
ANYONE REMEMBER OR HAVE PICTURES OF PFC RICHARD E. KISSICK

RANDALL STEGNER SR. wrote on June 29, 2010


City and State: NEW CASTLE IN

Unit:

Service or Relationship: INTERESTED PERSON

Comments:

Keywords: Wanting to hear from anyone who remembers serving with or have pictures of PFC Richard E. Kissick. He was a forward artillery spotter with 32nd Infrantry Regiment U.S.Army. KIA when North Koreans shelled his position. PFC Kissick was my wifes Uncle. Thank You!!!!


Entry: 75220
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
LOOKING FOR ANYONE THAT MAY REMEMBER ORVAL MARX FROM CO.

GRANT MARX wrote on June 25, 2010


City and State: BRIDGEPORT NE

Unit:

Service or Relationship: ARMY VETERAN

Comments: I also have a Liberty Pass from Btry D, 734th AAA Gun Bn (90mm) Base Oaklawn Ill.from May 29, 1953

Keywords: Harpo


Entry: 75207
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
LOOKING FOR FRIENDS OF JUAN C. HERNANDEZ

MARY GARZA wrote on June 24, 2010


City and State: TULARE CA

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: Hello my name is Mary Garza, this is all I know about my Uncle. Most of his family has pasted on or I have no contact, and I was wondering if anybody was servering along side of him or knew him. Anything would be helpfull, pictures would be great.I have only seen 1 picture of my Uncle, he died in the war before I was born.Thanks, and God Bless

Keywords: PFC JUAN C HERNANDEZ 32nd Infantry Regiment
7th Infantry Division Army
Hostile, Died (KIA)
Date Of Loss: February 8, 1952
Service Number: US56149546
TULARE COUNTY, CA Year of Birth: 1930
Burial Location TULARE, CA
Comments: Private First Class Hernandez was a member of the 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was Killed in Action while fighting the enemy in North Korea on February 8, 1952. Korean War Project Key No: 13037



Entry: 75100
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
LOOKING FOR INFORMATION ON

ROGER STEWART wrote on June 16, 2010


City and State: KOKOMO IN

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: looking of anyone or any information concerning my brother who was killed in action in april 1951 in the north korean sector.

Keywords: stewart,james e. company A 32nd infantry regiment 7th division korea.


Entry: 75002
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
INFO

PAUL HALL wrote on June 7, 2010


City and State: KINGSTON NY

Unit: 5TH MAR 1ST MAR DIV

Service or Relationship: FRIEND OF VETERAN

Comments: Searching for info on a high school buddy of mine,
Lt. Francis R. Filosa, ser# 01925312, a platoon leader
with the Ethiopian troops. He entered the service
5-16-52 at Fort Dix, discharged on 11-20-53 at Fort
Devens.


Keywords: 32nd rgmt 7th inf div usa korea 1952-53


Entry: 74841
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
SID BOTTS

COLIN BOTTS wrote on May 28, 2010


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments:

Keywords: Typo: Sid Botts was KIA 15 October 1952


Entry: 74840
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
SIDNEY J BOTTS

COLIN BOTTS wrote on May 28, 2010


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: I was looking for anyone who knew my Uncle Sid Botts while he was in the Army. He was KIA on 15 October 1951. I never got to meet him and My dad, Lyman (Gene) Botts was in the 187th Airborne in Korea never really would talk about him. If you knew him I would appreciate it if you could share a little about him. Thank you and God Bless all those who have served and defended this great country the United States of America.

Keywords: Sid Botts


Entry: 74455
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
ROBERT EATON, PORK CHOP HILL, 1953

RESA KIRKLAND wrote on April 22, 2010


City and State: MOSES LAKE WA

Unit: 32ND IR

Service or Relationship: INTERESTED PERSON

Comments: I am looking for Robert Eaton, who was listed on the Deceased Personnel File of Ricardo Carrasco as a witness to his death. Here is a brief of this exceptional story:

MEN WHO ANSWERED THE "WHY?"
THE AMERICAN SOLDIER

By: Resa LaRu Kirkland

***This article was originally written at the behest of MoH recipient Gen. Raymond Davis, USMC ret., and he had a segment of it run in Graybeards magazine two years ago.***

PFC Ricardo Carrasco is a name that I have determined will not fall into the anonymity of the abyss of time.

Why?

Well, Im not sure Im wise enough to answer such a simply complicated question, but I love a challenge and will at least make the attempt.

One would think that Ricardos story would be explanation enough. I agree; however, it sat for forty years collecting dust and slowly fading from memories. This disturbed me greatly. How could so perfect, so beautiful a sacrifice be forgotten?

Why?

I came to find out that it was forgotten because the full story had never been known in the first place. The truth of it was more stunning, more inspiring than anything man could have imagined.

Ricardo Carrasco arrived in Korea and landed on Old Baldy Hill in late March, 1953, just in time to join Company "A" of the 32nd Infantry Regiment of the 7th Division in a battle extraordinaire against Chinese Communist Forces. Baldy and its sister, the infamous Pork Chop Hill, would be his world for the next three months. He was 19, and had lived all of his life in El Paso, TX. Born during the depression and raised during WWII, Ricardo would cut his teeth on this first war against communism. He was the sixth of eight kids, and had wanted to be a career soldier like those men he had so admired in the newsreels of WWII. He received a terrible blow when he learned he could not be part of his beloved 82nd Airborne as hed always dreamed; he was slightly nearsighted, and with no particular skills, was assigned to the infantry.

He was cocky at boot camp; his letters gently teasing friends back home for not volunteering like he had. But his first day in Korea knocked the macho right out of him. His letters home now begged friends not to join up. He was terrified and a million miles from those he loved. He wanted nothing more than to go home. He never could have imagined that the opportunity would present itself on a silver platter.

Director Owen Crump knew war. He had filmed much of WWII in the Army Air Corps and was a full-bird by the end of the war. However, something about this new war ate at him, and he finally realized what it was. They werent showing the whole picture. He wanted to do just that, but wasnt sure how. His inspiration came in the form of a newspaper article written by Scripps-Howard war correspondent Jim Lucas. One simple line would instigate a movie: " It was a quiet day on the front with limited patrol action." Knowing war as he did, Crump knew there was no such thing as a "quiet day" for front-line soldiers. He wondered how those front-liners would write that line, and decided to do it for them. He had a revolutionary idea.

Crump approached Paramount Pictures producer Hal Wallis for help. He pitched his idea for the first movie ever filmed entirely on the front lines of a war. It would be in black and white to give it a documentary feel. Every soldier would be played by-of all things-a real front-line solder. No actors for this movie. Every explosion, every bullet would be the real, government-issued thing. Wallis loved the idea, and sent Crump and a skeletal crew to Korea to pick their men for the movies plot.

The movie was to be set on the last day of the war. A squad of 13 men, knowing that the cease fire would be declared that night, must still take a hill and set up an observation post. These are the most intense, most frightening moments of any war; everyone knows its over, but the bullets are still flying. Crump wanted to show the heartbreak of coming so close to the end, then dying anyway. He wanted the world to know the loss. One of the Americans in the fiction movie would die within hours of that cease fire.

Crump hand-picked his 13 American soldiers and one ROK soldier to play their parts. Among them was PFC Ricardo Carrasco. He would be the American to die in the movie.

Ricardo was livid at being chosen for the movie, but it was written up as a TDY, so he obeyed and went. Hed been squad leader when Crump had informed him of his new assignment, and he worried incessantly about his men. It was mid-June, 1953, and everyone knew the summer would out-live this war. It was over. But Ricardo knew of the Chinese desire to take Pork Chop, where he was fighting, and their habit of nighttime attacks. Every morning at the War Correspondents Building in Seoul-where the cast and crew were staying--he would run to a reporter and ask if the Chinese had attacked Pork Chop yet. Every night his prayers were the same: Please, God. Please dont let the Chinese attack before I can get back. So far, he had been "lucky"-at least in his way of thinking. He knew that hill, and he knew the horror. The thought of his "fellahs," as he called them, fighting and dying while he was getting the star treatment sickened him. He felt that he was shirking his duties, letting down his friends. The war had become for Ricardo what it becomes for all good men: it was no longer about democracy, America, or even the damned hill-it was about his love for his friends. He could never live with himself if one of them died in his place or because he wasnt there to help. His love over-ruled his fear.

The rumors of Chinese amassing around Pork Chop flew as the filming began. Every day Ricardo begged Crump to "kill" his character off so he could get back to his fellahs. Every day Crump told him they werent ready to film that scene yet. The other soldier/actors puzzled over this quiet, moody young man who had the opportunity of a lifetime. They loved this life! Good food served to them on tablecloths, by waiters no less, plenty of booze, and no one trying to kill them. They could not figure the kid out.

Still he continued to pester the director, who firmly reminded him that he was to obey his orders. Crump liked the kid, but couldnt reckon him. Maybe he loved the battle and terror, or maybe he was bucking for a promotion or a medal. Or maybe it was like he said; that his friends were up there. Crump figured the problem would be solved one day in early July when he received a wire from producer Hal Wallis. Wallis had seen the first rushes of the movie and had been so impressed by one young man in particular that he wanted Crump to get the boy to sign a contract with Paramount. Wallis knew a star when he saw one. In fact, in Hollywood he was referred to as "The Starmaker"; everyone hed ever tagged to be a star had become one. And now he had Ricardo Carrasco pegged as the next star he would mold and create.

Crump grinned as he ordered Ricardo aside from the other men. As he explained that Hal Wallis wanted to make the young man a star, he held his breath and waited for the reaction: a yelp, weak knees, all the color draining from his face and something to indicate his shock and excitement. But Ricardo stood still, the only movement being that of his head slightly lowering. Crump furrowed his brow, but before he could say anything, Ricardo spoke.

"No thank you, sir."

Now it was Crump who lost all color. He asked for an explanation. How could this kid turn down such an incredible offer from the most powerful producer in Hollywood? And how the hell was he supposed to tell Wallis?

At first Ricardo skirted the question, simply saying that it was time to get back and they didnt really need him here to make the movie, even though his part was a pivotal one. Crump could see that it was something else, and finally pried it out of the boy. Why did he want his character killed ahead of schedule? Why was he turning down once-in-a-lifetime opportunities to go back and fight in a war that would be over in a matter of days now? Why had he nagged the director from day one to get back to the mud and the digging and the fighting and the dying?

Why?

Ricardos voice was low and husky. After an eternity, he raised his head up and looked the director in the eye. He just had to go back. Crump had to let him go back. The director was angry now. Was the kid a martyr? Why was he beating a dead horse? Ricardos explanation would do little to quell his angst and frustration with this odd young man.

He told Crump that the men at the front were under his command. There was no hiding the tenderness he felt toward those men, or the responsibility. He pleaded with the director to let him go back and help his friends in the final battle he knew was brewing on Pork Chop. That was infinitely more important to him than a movie. The respect and safety of his fellahs meant so much more. He could not bear the thought of them up there, fighting and dying, while he was back in a safety zone being treated like royalty. It was not right.

Crump and Carrasco argued for the next hour. The director finally gave up and dismissed the private. He wired back to Hal Wallis that his offer had been declined.

Wallis was furious. Hed never been turned down before, especially not by a punk kid on some glory kick! But after he calmed down, he decided that since the war was going to be over soon, hed give the boy a chance to serve his country and fulfill his sense of obligation; then hed bring him home and make him Audy Murphy.

The young, lone private continued to ask the director to kill him off, in spite of that scene being about two weeks away. Crump finally gave up. They began shooting his death scene that same week, and finished the close-ups on the morning of July 6. Ricardo was enormously relieved when he learned that the Chinese had not yet made the rumored attack on Pork Chop, but he knew his luck would not hold for long. So that very afternoon he insisted on going back. Fellow actor Otis Wright drove the jeep, cussing Ricardo out the whole way for being a "damned fool." But Ricardo was quiet, only smiling or nodding his head, occasionally speaking of his mother. They arrived in the late afternoon; Ricardo turned to wave goodbye over his shoulder. His "luck" had held; he was back with his men before the final assault. He let out a sigh of relief. Hed made it back in time and but barely.

After darkness fell, Chinese Communist Forces began the final attack on Pork Chop Hill. It was brutal, and the cost for it would be high. So high, in fact, that American military leaders made a moral decision to pull off on July 10, only four days later.

It would not be in time for Ricardo. At about 2330 that night of July 6, a scant nine hours after wrapping up his movie death, a mortar round took out the left side of his head, wrapping up his life. Not many men can say they died twice in one day.

I dont know what happened that night. Oh, I have the casualty report and some documentation. But what has made the past twelve years of research into this story so agonizing is that Ive yet to find anyone who knew Ricardo and was with him that night. I must find someone. I must know if his going back made any difference to them that night. More importantly, I want them to know what Ricardo sacrificed to be there for them. Through my research and tracking down men, I have been astonished to learn that none of his fellow temporary thespians knew that he had been offered that contract from Wallis. Im willing to bet that the men for whom he sacrificed such an opportunity do not know just how much he gave up to be there with them that night. Ill bet they dont know that he didnt have to be there that night, wasnt supposed to be there that night, and had nagged and pestered and "killed" himself off early so he could be there that night. Ill bet they dont know the eeriness of him dying in both "reel" life and "real" life, on the very same day. Ill bet they dont know that he did what he did out of his love and concern for them. Ill bet they dont know why.

"Cease Fire!", as it would be titled, came out in November of 1953 with its all- soldier cast. Most of the men were flown to the New York and Los Angeles premieres in high style. They appeared on Ed Sullivan and the Gary Moore Show. But Ricardo was rarely mentioned. Out of respect for the Carrasco family, Crump re-shot the death scene later using an extra. He knew that watching her son die on the screen would be too much for Mrs. Carrasco to bear. He also edited Ricardo out of as many places as he could in the film, but his part was too important. He could not be totally eliminated.

Mrs. Carrasco took it hard. In one of his last letters home discussing the making of the movie, Ricardo had written a line that now seemed ominous and foreboding: "Dont worry when you see me die, Mom, its only acting." Her heart broke, and 18 months later, she, too died. She was only 47.

Paramount would be there to film Gen. Mark Clark signing the armistice only 21 days after Ricardo died. At one of their last meals together, the cast and crew of "Cease Fire!" raised their glasses to "the one who isnt here." He was rarely mentioned thereafter.

Why?

Why would he go back to fight in a war that was over anyway? He had been under orders; no one would have thought less of him. In fact, no one had expected him back before the end of the war. They assumed when he was chosen in mid-June that he would be gone the rest of the summer. So why did he go back to fight in a war that was almost over, however tenuous that ending might be? Why would God allow one such as Ricardo to give up so much, but have his sacrifice virtually unknown by the very ones for whom he did everything? Ive pondered that long and hard myself.

Why?

I once listened with great interest to a man explain his interpretation of Abrahams sacrifice of Isaac. The question had been posed: If God is omniscient, then he knew what Abraham would do. He knew this faithful son loved Him more than even his own long-promised son, and would give him up at his Fathers command. Then why the test at all? Why did God ask Abraham to do what He already knew he would do?

Why?

Then came the answer that to me seemed so perfect, so beautiful in its simplicity that it had to be right. God had to prove to Abraham just how strong he was. It wasnt that God doubted Abrahams capability and it was that being mortal, Abraham doubted himself. Abraham had to know what Abraham could do. Like everything God does, it was not for His benefit, but for ours. I loved it! This was so very characteristic of our Father in Heaven and to show us, weak as we are, that we have within the seeds of godhood, Deitys DNA. That we are capable of turning evil that we do or that is done against us into something divine is what makes us most like God; a "God Moment," as I often call magnanimous acts of mere mortal men.

This analogy is the warrior spirit defined. I have always felt that man is at his most spiritual when he is at war. Now this puzzles many who have heard me say this. Surely war is an evil, murderous event in our existence for which we are punished by God, right? How can it then also be good?

Why?

I have been studying the men of the Korean War for twelve years now. These valiant servants of both God and man hesitate to speak of what theyve seen, what theyve done. I have seen their tears, slow and trembling on the edge of graying eyelashes, slipping down care-worn cheeks as they recount their tales of war. I have strained to hear their voices, so low with the agony of this cross they bear. Many of their tears are for the brutality and horror inherent in war and the dead and mangled bodies of beloved friends, boys barely old enough to shave now forever frozen in time, never aging another moment in the memories of those who watched them die.

But what has touched me most is their anguish at what they hesitate to share and and that is the memories of what that war forced them to do. These gentle men, who lovingly cup the face of a child or make love with tenderness and sincerity to the woman they adore, sob over the clear and unforgiving images of those they were forced to kill. It is the memories of these long gone screams, these tears, this enemy pain that haunt them most as the years go by. For all of the hatred and anger they may have felt against the enemy, it is still a hard thing to kill another man. However they may have understood the need to kill the enemy, the need to win the war, the price they pay is still the greatest to bear. They did what they had to do, and would do it again if faced with it, but the price such action exacts from a tender soul is no small thing.

This is a most glorious testament to manhood and the warrior spirit and that they bear this arduous burden with quiet dignity so those they love wont have to. The beauty of this selfless act leaves me in awe. I have long understood the willingness to die for a friend and after all, that is the epitome of what Christ did, and for which we mortals strive. He died that we might live. But those who must live with the memories not only of dead friends but butchered enemies are the closest we, as weak, wretched beings born into this veil of tears, can ever come to knowing what Christ bore. The memories of war are the price that the good man pays; it is out of his deep love for others that he spares them this particular agony. It is perhaps summed up best this way: Upon these two laws doth every commandment hinge-that we love God, and that we love each other. There is no better example on earth of this unconditional love than the American soldier. They would die for their friends, true, but even more heart-breaking and remarkable about such men is that they also live with what theyve had to do.

The Korean War Veterans who went on to live instead of dying on that distant soil are acutely aware of such suffering. They came home to nothing-no "Thank yous", no recognition-just nothingness. America acted as if the Korean War had never happened, in spite of it being the only war from the twentieth century that is still being waged. This was unimaginable to these men who had seen WWII and the honor bestowed upon their fathers, their older brothers, or even themselves. Their homeland wouldnt even give them the decorum of calling their campaign a war. And yet it is a direct result of what they gave-and gave up-for what they believed and for those they loved that made possible my own existence. I sit and write today because of what they stood and gave yesterday.

Is the soldier man at his most base animal or most spiritual God? Is it the monster coming out in us, or the Deity weaving its way in? This is what I see when I look into the eyes of our warrior brethren. Thrown into the most horrifying concoction of mans inhumanity to man, it is the fact that these mortals are capable of such unselfish, beautiful acts of humanity-no, Divinity-that reaches the heart and soul of those left behind in a dust-cloud of wonder. Of all Gods children, surely He must relate to and glory over the American soldier.

Why?

Greatest of all warriors on earth, the American soldier is capable of fighting fiercely, loving gently, living nobly, and forgiving totally. These are not the war-mongers that feminists and Hollywood have tried desperately to portray; these are gentle, loving creatures who want nothing more than to be free to go on living and loving. It is this desire that enables our brothers to choose to step out of their own selfish tendencies on behalf of another.

Why?

Just like with Abraham, God was showing Ricardo just how good, how magnificent he truly was capable of becoming. God was willing to sacrifice His son because He knew there were good men out there like Abraham and Ricardo-and most good soldiers--and he wanted them back with Him. Whether it requires dying for a friend or living with the memories, the order of the day for the American soldier is and always has been that of sacrifice. For them, "life, fortune, and sacred honor" are not only words. They know this meaning by their wounded hearts; no one has to tell them why.


Keywords: 7th Division, 32nd IR, Pork Chop Hill, Robert Eaton, Michael Kemp, Ricardo Carrasco, Paramount Pictures, Hal Wallis, Owen Crump, CEASE FIRE! movie


Entry: 74375
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
SGT MIKE O'GRADY, CHICAGO, 1951-1953 KOREA

GEORGE VUKELICH wrote on April 16, 2010


City and State: DOWNERS GROVE IL

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: Seeking anyone who served with Sgt. Mike O'Grady. Mike was a young Irish immigrant who was drafted into the US Army shortly after he immigrated to the United States. Some of the people he served with were O.W. "Al" Wilson from Wind Gap, PA, Allen and Walker. Mike is still alive and kicking at age 81 and would like to make contact with his old friends.

Keywords: Knob Hill, Jane Russell Hill, 32nd Regiment, Buccaneer Command Post


Entry: 74165
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
LOOKING FOR INFORMATION ON COL. BILLY BRADLEY NICHOLAS

JOHN SHACKELFORD wrote on March 31, 2010


City and State: BATON ROUGE LA

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments:

Keywords: At the time i know my grandfather was an officer in Korea but not sure
of his rank. I do have his medals and know he was a recipient of the
silver star and bronze star. I would do anything to find out what kind of
man he was and what he contributed to the war effort.
- a respectful grandson (john bradley shackelford)


p.s. - please respond if you have ever served with or under Col. Billy
Bradley Nicholas



Entry: 74015
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
SGT. GALLO MORTAR F.O. 3RD BATTALION

RICHARD D. (DICK) THORSEN wrote on March 21, 2010


City and State: MINNEAPOLIS MN

Unit: C BATTERY 48TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION

Service or Relationship: ARMY VETERAN

Comments: Does anyone know Sgt Gallo who was a mortar forward observer? He later transferred to HQ Battery, 48th Field Artillery where he was badly burned in a gasoliner fire. Great guy. Wonder if he's still alive.

Keywords: Mortr Forward Observer, 3rd Battalion, 32nd Inf Regiment


Entry: 73608
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
PFC RICARDO CARRASCO, 7TH DIV., 32ND IR, CO

RESA KIRKLAND wrote on February 17, 2010


City and State: MOSES LAKE WA

Unit: 32ND IR

Service or Relationship: INTERESTED PERSON

Comments: It all started with the attached article that my mom's dad, Robert Kirkland, found in the READER'S DIGEST in November, 1959, written by famous producer and STARMAKER Hall Wallis. You see, Robert Kirkland had grown up with--and was best friends with--Ricardo Carrasco. He thought he had known the story of his best friend's sojourn in Korea. He was wrong.

Ricardo Carrasco arrived in Korea and landed on Old Baldy Hill in late March, 1953, just in time to join Company "A" of the 32nd Infantry Regiment of the 7th Division in a battle extraordinaire against Chinese Communist Forces. Baldy and its sister, the infamous Pork Chop Hill, would be his world for the next three months. He was 19, and had lived all of his life in El Paso, TX. Born during the depression and raised during WWII, Ricardo would cut his teeth on this first war against communism. He was the sixth of eight kids, and had wanted to be a career soldier like those men he had so admired in the newsreels of WWII. He joined the Army only 4 weeks after graduating from Stephen F. Austin High School in El Paso; only 2 weeks after his best friend, Robert, had joined the Navy. He received a terrible blow when he learned he could not be part of his beloved 82nd Airborne as he'd always dreamed; he was slightly nearsighted, and with no particular skills, was assigned to the infantry.

He was cocky at boot camp; his letters gently teasing friends back home for not volunteering like he had. But his first day in Korea knocked the macho right out of him. His letters home now begged friends not to join up. He was terrified and a million miles from those he loved. He wanted nothing more than to go home. He never could have imagined that the opportunity would present itself on a silver platter.

Director Owen Crump knew war. He had filmed much of WWII in the Army Air Corps and was a full-bird by the end of the war. However, something about this new war ate at him, and he finally realized what it was. They weren't showing the whole picture. He wanted to do just that, but wasn't sure how. His inspiration came in the form of a newspaper article written by Scripps-Howard war correspondent Jim Lucas. One simple line would instigate a movie: " It was a quiet day on the front with limited patrol action." Knowing war as he did, Crump knew there was no such thing as a "quiet day" for front-line soldiers. How absurd. He wondered how those front-liners would write that line, and decided to do it for them. He had a revolutionary idea.

Crump approached Paramount Pictures producer Hal Wallis for help. He pitched his idea for the first movie ever filmed entirely on the front lines of a war. It would be in black and white to give it a documentary feel. Every soldier would be played by--of all things-a real front--line solder. No actors for this movie. Every explosion, every bullet would be the real, government-issued thing. Wallis loved the idea, and sent Crump and a skeletal crew to Korea to pick their men for the movie's plot. To add to the unique feel, it would be the first--and only--war movie to be shot in the latest movie fad: 3-D.

The movie was to be set on the last day of the war. A squad of 13 men, knowing that the cease fire would be declared that night, must still take a hill and set up an observation post. These are the most intense, most frightening moments of any war; everyone knows it's over, but the bullets are still flying. Crump wanted to show the heartbreak of coming so close to the end, then dying anyway. He wanted the world to know the loss. One of the Americans in the fiction movie would die within hours of that cease fire.
Crump hand-picked his 13 American soldiers and one ROK soldier to play their parts. Among them was PFC Ricardo Carrasco. He would be the American to die in the movie.

Ricardo was livid at being chosen for the movie, but it was written up as a TDY, so he obeyed and went. He'd been squad leader when Crump had informed him of his new assignment, and he worried incessantly about his men. It was mid-June, 1953, and everyone knew the summer would out-live this war. It was over. But Ricardo knew of the Chinese desire to take Pork Chop, where he was fighting, and their habit of nighttime attacks. Every morning at the War Correspondents Building in Seoul-where the cast and crew were staying--he would run to a reporter and ask if the Chinese had attacked Pork Chop yet. Every night his prayers were the same: Please, God. Please don't let the Chinese attack before I can get back. So far, he had been "lucky"--at least in his way of thinking. He knew that hill, and he knew the horror. The thought of his "fellahs," as he called them, fighting and dying while he was getting the star treatment sickened him. He felt that he was shirking his duties, letting down his friends. The war had become for Ricardo what it becomes for all good men: it was no longer about democracy, America, or even the damned hill-it was about his love for his friends. He could never live with himself if one of them died in his place or because he wasn't there to help. His love over-ruled his fear.
The rumors of Chinese amassing around Pork Chop flew as the filming began. Every day Ricardo begged Crump to "kill" his character off so he could get back to his fellahs. Every day Crump told him they weren't ready to film that scene yet. The other soldier/actors puzzled over this quiet, moody young man who had the opportunity of a lifetime. They loved this life! Good food served to them on tablecloths, by waiters no less, plenty of booze, and no one trying to kill them. They could not figure the kid out.

Still he continued to pester the director, who firmly reminded him that he was to obey his orders. Crump liked the kid, but couldn't reckon him. Maybe he loved the battle and terror, or maybe he was bucking for a promotion or a medal. Or maybe it was like he said; that his friends were up there. Crump figured the problem would be solved one day in early July when he received a wire from producer Hal Wallis. Wallis had seen the first rushes of the movie and had been so impressed by one young man in particular that he wanted Crump to get the boy to sign a contract with Paramount. Wallis knew a star when he saw one. In fact, in Hollywood he was referred to as "The Starmaker"; everyone he'd ever tagged to be a star had become one. And now he had Ricardo Carrasco pegged as the next star he would mold and create.

Crump grinned as he ordered Ricardo aside from the other men. As he explained that Hal Wallis wanted to make the young man a star, he held his breath and waited for the reaction: a yelp, weak knees, all the color draining from his face... something to indicate his shock and excitement. But Ricardo stood still, the only movement being that of his head slightly lowering. Crump furrowed his brow, but before he could say anything, Ricardo spoke.

"No thank you, sir."

Now it was Crump who was stunned into silence. He asked for an explanation. How could this kid turn down such an incredible offer from the most powerful producer in Hollywood? And how the hell was he supposed to tell Wallis?

At first Ricardo skirted the question, simply saying that it was time to get back and they didn't really need him here to make the movie, even though his part was a pivotal one. Crump could see that it was something else, and finally pried it out of the boy. Why did he want his character killed ahead of schedule? Why was he turning down once-in-a-lifetime opportunities to go back and fight in a war that would be over in a matter of days now? Why had he nagged the director from day one to get back to the mud and the digging and the fighting and the dying?

Why?

Ricardo's voice was low and husky. After an eternity, he raised his head up and looked the director in the eye. He just had to go back. Crump had to let him go back. The director was angry now. Was the kid a martyr? Why was he beating a dead horse? Ricardo's explanation would do little to quell his angst and frustration with this odd young man.

He told Crump that the men at the front were under his command. There was no hiding the tenderness he felt toward those men, or the responsibility. He pleaded with the director to let him go back and help his friends in the final battle he knew was brewing on Pork Chop. That was infinitely more important to him than a movie. The respect and safety of his fellahs meant so much more. He could not bear the thought of them up there, fighting and dying, while he was back in a safety zone being treated like royalty. It was not right.

Crump and Carrasco argued for the next hour. The director finally gave up and dismissed the private. He wired back to Hal Wallis that his offer had been declined.

Wallis was furious. He'd never been turned down before, especially not by a punk kid on some glory kick! But after he calmed down, he decided that since the war was going to be over soon, he'd give the boy a chance to serve his country and fulfill his sense of obligation; then he'd bring him home and make him Audy Murphy.
The young, lone private continued to ask the director to kill him off, in spite of that scene being about two weeks away. Crump finally gave up. They began shooting his death scene that same week, and finished the close-ups on the morning of July 6. Ricardo was enormously relieved when he learned that the Chinese had not yet made the rumored attack on Pork Chop, but he knew his luck would not hold for long. So that very afternoon he insisted on going back. Fellow actor Otis Wright drove the jeep, cussing Ricardo out the whole way for being a "damned fool." But Ricardo was quiet, only smiling or nodding his head, occasionally speaking of his mother. They arrived in the late afternoon; Ricardo turned to wave goodbye over his shoulder. His "luck" had held; he was back with his men before the final assault. He let out a sigh of relief. He'd made it back in time... but barely.

After darkness fell, Chinese Communist Forces began the final attack on Pork Chop Hill. It was brutal, and the cost for it would be high. So high, in fact, that American military leaders made a moral decision to pull off on July 10, only four days later.

It would not be in time for Ricardo. At about 2330 that night of July 6, a scant nine hours after wrapping up his movie death, a mortar round took out the left side of his head, wrapping up his life. Not many men can say they died twice in one day.

I don't know what happened that night. Oh, I have the casualty report and some documentation. But what has made the past twelve years of research into this story so agonizing is that I've yet to find anyone who knew Ricardo and was with him that night. Most people don't understand why that is so important to us, to this remarkable story. We tell them simply this: it was of utter importance to Ricardo to be there for the final battle. He gave up more than most in order to do so. We must know if his going back made any difference to them that night. More importantly, we want them to know what Ricardo sacrificed to be there for them.

Through our research and tracking down men, we have been astonished to learn that none of his fellow temporary thespians knew that he had been offered that contract from Wallis. I'm willing to bet that the men for whom he sacrificed such an opportunity do not know just how much he gave up to be there with them that night. I'll bet they don't know that he didn't have to be there that night, wasn't supposed to be there that night, and had nagged and pestered and "killed" himself off early so he could be there that night. I'll bet they don't know the eeriness of him dying in both "reel" life and "real" life, on the very same day. I'll bet they don't know that he did what he did out of his love and concern for them. I'll bet they don't know why.

"Cease Fire!", as it would be titled, came out in November of 1953 with its all- soldier cast. Most of the men were flown to the New York and Los Angeles premieres in high style. They appeared on Ed Sullivan and the Gary Moore Show. But Ricardo was rarely mentioned. Out of respect for the Carrasco family, Crump re-shot the death scene later using an extra. He knew that watching her son die on the screen would be too much for Mrs. Carrasco to bear. He also edited Ricardo out of as many places as he could in the film, but his part was too important. He could not be totally eliminated.

Mrs. Carrasco took it hard. In his last letters home discussing the making of the movie, Ricardo had written a line that now seemed ominous and foreboding: "Don't worry when you see me die, Mom, it's only acting." Her heart broke, and 18 months later, she, too died. She was only 47.

Paramount would be there to film Gen. Mark Clark signing the armistice only 21 days after Ricardo died. At one of their last meals together, the cast and crew of "Cease Fire!" raised their glasses to "the one who isn't here." He was rarely mentioned thereafter.

Why?

Why would he go back to fight in a war that was over anyway? He had been under orders; no one would have thought less of him. In fact, no one had expected him back before the end of the war. They assumed when he was chosen in mid-June that he would be gone the rest of the summer. So why did he go back to fight in a war that was almost over, however tenuous that ending might be? Why would God allow one such as Ricardo to give up so much, but have his sacrifice virtually unknown by the very ones for whom he did everything? I've pondered that long and hard myself.

Why?

I once listened with great interest to a man explain his interpretation of Abraham's sacrifice of Isaac. The question had been posed: If God is omniscient, then he knew what Abraham would do. He knew this faithful son loved Him more than even his own long-promised son, and would give him up at his Father's command. Then why the test at all? Why did God ask Abraham to do what He already knew he would do?

Why?

Then came the answer that to me seemed so perfect, so beautiful in its simplicity that it had to be right. God had to prove to Abraham just how strong he was. It wasn't that God doubted Abraham's capability... it was that being mortal, Abraham doubted himself. Abraham had to know what Abraham could do. Like everything God does, it was not for His benefit, but for ours. I loved it! This was so very characteristic of our Father in Heaven... to show us, weak as we are, that we have within the seeds of godhood, Deity's DNA. That we are capable of turning evil that we do or that is done against us into something divine is what makes us most like God; a "God Moment," as my mom always called magnanimous acts of mere mortal men.
This analogy is the warrior spirit defined. My mom always felt that man is at his most spiritual when he is at war. Now this puzzles many who have heard her say this. Surely war is an evil, murderous event in our existence for which we are punished by God, right? How can it then also be good?

Why?

Mom has been studying the men of the Korean War for twelve years now. These valiant servants of both God and man hesitate to speak of what they've seen, what they've done. She has seen their tears, slow and trembling on the edge of graying eyelashes, slipping down care-worn cheeks as they recount their tales of war, strained to hear their voices, so low with the agony of this cross they bear. Many of their tears are for the brutality and horror inherent in war... the dead and mangled bodies of beloved friends, boys barely old enough to shave now forever frozen in time, never aging another moment in the memories of those who watched them die.

But what has touched her most is their anguish at what they hesitate to share... and that is the memories of what that war forced them to do. These gentle men, who lovingly cup the face of a child or make love with tenderness and sincerity to the woman they adore, sob over the clear and unforgiving images of those they were forced to kill. It is the memories of these long gone screams, these tears, this enemy pain that haunt them most as the years go by. For all of the hatred and anger they may have felt against the enemy, it is still a hard thing to kill another man. However they may have understood the need to kill the enemy, the need to win the war, the price they pay is still the greatest to bear. They did what they had to do, and would do it again if faced with it, but the price such action exacts from a tender soul is no small thing.

This is a most glorious testament to manhood and the warrior spirit... that they bear this arduous burden with quiet dignity so those they love won't have to. The beauty of this selfless act leaves me in awe. I have long understood the willingness to die for a friend... after all, that is the epitome of what Christ did, and for which we mortals strive. He died that we might live. But those who must live with the memories not only of dead friends but butchered enemies are the closest we, as weak, wretched beings born into this veil of tears, can ever come to knowing what Christ bore. The memories of war are the price that the good man pays; it is out of his deep love for others that he spares them this particular agony. It is perhaps summed up best this way: Upon these two laws doth every commandment hinge-that we love God, and that we love each other. There is no better example on earth of this unconditional love than the American soldier. They would die for their friends, true, but even more heart-breaking and remarkable about such men is that they also live with what they've had to do.

The Korean War Veterans who went on to live instead of dying on that distant soil are acutely aware of such suffering. They came home to nothing--no "Thank you's", no recognition--just nothingness. America acted as if the Korean War had never happened, in spite of it being the only war from the twentieth century that is still being waged. This was unimaginable to these men who had seen WWII and the honor bestowed upon their fathers, their older brothers, or even themselves. Their homeland wouldn't even give them the decorum of calling their campaign a war. And yet it is a direct result of what they gave--and gave up--for what they believed and for those they loved that made possible my own existence. My mother and I sit and write today because of what they stood and gave yesterday.

Is the soldier man at his most base animal or most spiritual God? Is it the monster coming out in us, or the Deity weaving its way in? This is what we see when we look into the eyes of our warrior brethren. Thrown into the most horrifying concoction of man's inhumanity to man, it is the fact that these mortals are capable of such unselfish, beautiful acts of humanity--no, Divinity--that reaches the heart and soul of those left behind in a dust-cloud of wonder. Of all God's children, surely He must relate to and glory over the American soldier.

Why?

Greatest of all warriors on earth, the American soldier is capable of fighting fiercely, loving gently, living nobly, and forgiving totally. These are not the war-mongers that feminists and Hollywood have tried desperately to portray; these are gentle, loving creatures who want nothing more than to be free to go on living and loving. It is this desire that enables our brothers to choose to step out of their own selfish tendencies on behalf of another.

Why?

Just like with Abraham, God was showing Ricardo just how good, how magnificent he truly was capable of becoming. God was willing to sacrifice His son because He knew there were good men out there like Abraham and Ricardo--and most good soldiers--and he wanted them back with Him. Whether it requires dying for a friend or living with the memories, the order of the day for the American soldier is and always has been that of sacrifice. For them, "life, fortune, and sacred honor" are not only words. They know this meaning by their wounded hearts; no one has to tell them why.

Resa LaRu Kirkland, americaswarchick.blogspot.com
resalaru@gmail.com, 509-766-1475


Keywords: WARCHICK, Korea, Pork Chop Hill, Old Baldy, Paramount Pictures 1953 Korean War film CEASE FIRE!


Entry: 73455
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
DO YOU KNOW MY GRANDFATHER PAUL DELANEY

MICHELLE STARR wrote on February 6, 2010


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: just saw a clip on the korean war on the military channel, with a picture that looks exactley like my grandfather paul e delaney from west virginia. just curious if it is in fact my grandfather. he show was called the koren war our time in hell part 1 and 2. anyone with answers please contact me.

Keywords: the korean war "our time in hell"


Entry: 73433
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
ANIBAL LOPEZ FERRER - LOOKING FOR SERVICE BUDDIES

ANIBAL LOPEZ FERRER wrote on February 4, 2010


City and State: PALM BAY FL

Unit: 32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT

Service or Relationship: ARMY VETERAN

Comments: I am looking to reconnect with my buddies from the Korean War. I served from 1954 to 1955. I am originally from Puerto Rico.

Keywords: Lopez


Entry: 72862
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
LOOKING FOR ANY INFORMATION ON MY GRANDPA.

JOSH SHEPARD wrote on December 23, 2009


City and State: HILLSBORO MO

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: My father never really knew his father. It would mean alot to me if someone that knew him might be able to help find out what kind of man he was. I'm thankful for any help.

Keywords: I am looking for anyone who might have know my grandfather, John Henry Sheppard 32nd Inf Regt-7th Inf Div. I remember him talking about the war some, but it was something that he didn't discuss much. I want to understand what happened and what he and the rest of our brave soldiers over there had to endure. He pass in 1985. Thanks to all who have served in the service of our great country.


Entry: 72842
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
INFORMATION ABOUT MY FATHER

LULIO RUIZ wrote on December 20, 2009


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments:

Keywords: Looking into information about my father. He was in the 3 squad 57mm RR, 4 PLT, Co G, 2 bn, 32 inf regt, 7 division. Korea 1952-1953


Entry: 72597
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
HEAVY MORTAR CO. 32ND INF. REG. 7TH INF. DIV.

DOMINICK PISCIONE wrote on November 30, 2009


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: I am looking for anyone that served with my father, Dominick Sam Piscione from Hillside Pennsylvania, in Korea. I have a lot of photos and memorabilia but no connection. He died in 1962 at age 34.

Keywords: Hill 598 (Triangle Hill) Oct. 23, 1952
Queen's Own, 7th Infantry Division, Heavy Motar Co.
APO 7



Entry: 72588
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
LOOKING FOR ANYONE WHO KNEW MY GRANDFATHER ROBERT E GREGORY

MATTHEW CAMPBELL wrote on November 29, 2009


City and State: HOPKINSVILLE KY

Unit:

Service or Relationship: AIR FORCE VETERAN

Comments: If anyone knew my grandfather Robert E Gregory please contact me! He was killed in Korea when my mother was only six months old. He recieved a silver star and purple heart and i would love to hear more about him if possible. Thank you for your service and your time!
Matt Campbell
270-498-2140


Keywords:


Entry: 72518
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
PORK CHOP AND THE CHOSIN

LES BRANSCUM wrote on November 25, 2009


City and State: MAYFLOWER AR

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: I am trying to find out what unit my father, Douglas Branscum, was in. My mother told me he was at Pork Chop Hill and the Chosin. Does anyone remember CPL Branscum?

Keywords: Pork Chop Hill, Chosin


Entry: 72426
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
TRYING TO FIND MY GRANDFATHER

MATT BAXLEY wrote on November 19, 2009


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments:

Keywords: My grandmother told me that my grandfather served on pork chop hill in korea. He never talked about his time there just trying to see if anyone new him. His name was Frank Dodd i believe he was CPL. If anyone could help me I just want to know more about him.


Entry: 72293
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
CO. A 32ND INF REGT - LOOKING FOR DON BELL INFO

ALAN BELL wrote on November 11, 2009


City and State: GA

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: CO. A 32nd INF REGT - LOOKING FOR DON BELL INFO AND COMPANY MEMBERS
WOUNDED OCT 1952 BATTLE TRIANGLE HILL
ALSO BOBBY VICKERS INFO


Keywords: TRIANGLE HILL OCT 1952 WIA DON BELL


Entry: 72143
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
HD AND HD 32ND REG RADIO SECTION

ALLEN HALE wrote on October 30, 2009


City and State: HANOVER PA

Unit: HD7HD CO. 32ND INF REG 7TH DIV

Service or Relationship: ARMY VETERAN

Comments:

Keywords: looking for henry middleton


Entry: 71859
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
SARGENT JOE HOWARD

JOHN LAHOOD wrote on October 6, 2009


City and State: KENNESAW GA

Unit:

Service or Relationship: OTHER

Comments: Just looking for anyone who may have known my grandfather. He didn't talk much about the war, and all i have to find out about him is his papers when he left the Army. Intrested in everything concerning his time in Korea, as well as the men he was there with. Thanks alot.

Feel free to email me with any information about the war.


Keywords:


Entry: 71815
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT

WILLIAM LEWIS SR. wrote on October 1, 2009


City and State:

Unit: 32ND INFANTRY / COMPANY B

Service or Relationship: ARMY VETERAN

Comments:

Keywords: Looking for some of the old boys who were with me in Korea from 1956 and 1957. Like Pete Caprio. Ed Mascula,
Mitt Day.



Entry: 71812
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
32ND INFANTRY REGIMEN

ROBERT SCHOTT wrote on October 1, 2009


City and State: SCOTT CITY MO

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: My dad, Vernon Scherer, was in the Korean war and was injured 1953. I am looking for Robert MaGuire or anyone else that may have served at this time with him. Thank you very much.

Keywords: Robert MaGuire
Old Baldy



Entry: 71692
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
ROBERT COSTELLO

MOIRA COSTELLO FURMAN wrote on September 21, 2009


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: Looking for anyone who may have known my father. Robert Costello was in occupied Japan after WWII and was called back for the Korean Conflict. At one time he served with the 32nd Queen's own infantry. He was a corporal and a battery aid man. He fought with someone named Kenneth Hotopp of Chicago and also a Lt. John B. Haberer (I have a picture from a newspaper of the three in Korea). He was featured in the June 2nd, 1951 edition of the Pacific Stars and Stripes as "Sgt. Painless Costello" giving an injection to a superior officer. Unfortunately, his war memerobilia, including paperwork, were discarded many years ago and I do not even know his unit.

Keywords:


Entry: 71572
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
ARTHUR MEISBERGER

JEREMIAH JACKSON wrote on September 10, 2009


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: ARMY VETERAN

Comments: im looking for anybody that served with my grandfather ARTHUR MEISBERGER. if any one that has any pictures or knew him please contact me.

Keywords: korean war ,32nd infantry 7 division


Entry: 71456
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
UNCLE CARLTON RAY BRIGHT

SANDRA BRIGHT wrote on August 30, 2009


City and State: ELIZABETH CIY NC

Unit:

Service or Relationship: OTHER

Comments: I AM STILL LOOKING FOR ANY INFORMATION ON MY UNCLE CARLTON RAY BRIGHT HE WAS MIA ON DEC 2 1950 WAS PERSUMED DEAD ON DEC 31 1953 AT THE CHOSIN RESERVOIR HE IS FROM ELIZABETH CITY NC HIS BODY WAS NEVER RECOVERED ANYONE WITH ANY INFORMATION ON HIM PLEASE CONTACT ME SANDRA CRITZ

Keywords:


Entry: 71054
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
WONDERING

BRUCE CHRISTENSEN wrote on July 29, 2009


City and State: COTATI CA

Unit: 32ND INF.

Service or Relationship: OTHER

Comments: Looking for informtion regarding my father Paul Christensen 32nd inf. Korea. went on to UNPIK, Special Forces. 1st Lt. Understand he was a hard ass CO. Would like info on his aciton. Wounded twice in Korea. Contact me

Keywords: 32nd Infantry


Entry: 69923
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
REMEMBER ME

GEORGE KING wrote on April 20, 2009


City and State: LYNN MA

Unit: HQ CO LST BN, 32D INF REGT 7TH INF DIVJUST TRF

Service or Relationship: ARMY VETERAN

Comments: just a few months before we went to Korea and landed at Inchon Korea in Sep 50, I am now retired, 78 years of age and still remember some times

Keywords: trf to Hq Btry 48th FA Bn, 32d Inf Regt RCT Inchon Landing Korea Sep 50, friend of BJ company clerk of co D, 32dInf regt


Entry: 69879
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
GARLAND TAULBEE 32ND INFANTRY REG. 7TH DIVISION CO. C

DALLAS WRIGHT wrote on April 15, 2009


City and State:

Unit: 32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT 7TH DIVISION COMPANY C 1ST

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: wanting to find someone who may have served with my grandpa Garland Taulbee. he was in the chosin reservoir in November-december 1950. he was in the 32nd infantry regiment 7th division 1st battalion company C attached to the 1st marine regiment. he was awarded distinguished service cross for being one of the 9 remaining in his company. He was also all army boxing champion i believe in 1949.if anyone had served with him from august 1948-november 1952 please contact me through email and i will get back to you asap. he really wants to meet up with anyone who he knew or knew him. he dont really remember a lot of names but remembers faces really well so pictures would be very appreciated in this search for lost friends. tyvm to anyone who gets in touch with me you dont know what it would mean to him.

Keywords: Chosin Res. Chosin death march, amphibious landing in Inchon


Entry: 69699
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
LOOKING FOR JOHN LILLIE - ABLE COMPANY

ED VANEK wrote on March 31, 2009


City and State: RICE LAKE WI

Unit: 7TH DIV. 32ND REG. 2ND BATT. ABLE CO.

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: Looking for others that served with John, he was a sniper and got wounded by mortar fire and hasn't seen or heard of any of the guys since. Any info will be forwarded to John. THANK YOU

Keywords: John Lillie- 2nd Platoon 2nd Squad- WIA Kumhwa Iron Triangle- Oct 15, 1952 (Army)


Entry: 69436
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT

ROBERT D. MITCHELL JR. wrote on March 9, 2009


City and State: FLORENCE AL

Unit: MED. CO. 31ST INF. REGT.

Service or Relationship: ARMY VETERAN

Comments:

Keywords: Pork Chop Hill, Hill 200.


Entry: 69014
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
LOOKING FOR INFORMATION ON CPL ROBERT D BATES

PAUL BAKER wrote on February 7, 2009


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: Any one know my grandpa robert danial bates , he had a card from the 32nd buccaneer queens own rifles 1952 any one remmeber him or know where he served? He was a cpl. I know he saw combat but im not sure what battle. Thank you so much.

Keywords: nicknames battles units personal friends


Entry: 68890
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
PVT. DOMINGO J. GONZALES- TEXAS

MARIA (ROSIE) MALDONADO wrote on January 30, 2009


City and State: SAN MARCOS TX

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: Iam hoping there is still someone out there that served with my brother from about March through October of 1951. The information I have is that he was killed at a battle at Satae-ri or Talleylong, Korea on October 24, 1951. His picture is posted in the Korean War Project Remembrance. It would be nice to hear from someone that knew him and share with his family details of his life. The day he joined the Army was the last time his family saw him.

Keywords: Rosie


Entry: 68807
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
PORK CHOP HILL

ROGER LEBLANC wrote on January 24, 2009


City and State: NEW IBERIA LA

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: MY FATHER SERVED IN THE KOREAN WAR AND WAS ONE OF THE FEW SURVIVORS OF PORK CHOP HILL.HE ALSO FOUGHT ON OLD BALDY,AND OTHERS.HE WAS IN THE 32ND INFANTRY DIVISION,THE BUCCANEERS,(H)HEADQUARTERS COMPANY.HE IS ABOUT TO BE 82 YEARS OLD AND IS STILL LIVING HERE IN LOUISIANA.

Keywords: PORK CHOP HILL,OLD BALDY,H COMPANY,BUCCANEERS


Entry: 68805
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
YEAR OF 1947 IN CHUN CHON

LOUIS EPTON wrote on January 24, 2009


City and State: LAS VEGAS NV

Unit: 7TH DIV. 32ND INF.

Service or Relationship: ARMY VETERAN

Comments: There as parllel guards. Worked Maleria control

Keywords:


Entry: 68730
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
7TH DIVISION 32ND INFANTRY I COMPANY

CHARLIE LEWIS wrote on January 18, 2009


City and State: AUGUSTA GA

Unit: 7TH DIVISION 32 INFANTRY I COMPANY

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: I am looking for anyone who knew Ray Barlow my father in law while he was in Korea.

Keywords: Raymon Barlow.


Entry: 68353
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
MIKE LAMB C CO. 32ND INF

TOM ADAMS wrote on December 22, 2008


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: Mike Lamb stationed at Camp Hovey 1960 with Company C, 32nd Inf. 7th Inf. Division. Mike was from Dallas, Texas. I can get in touch with Mike if someone knows him. He lives in Royce City, Texas. He was 7th Div. Champion in boxing. He did a lot of boxing in the Army.

Keywords: Camp Hovey, Co. C, 32nd Inf., 7th Inf. Div. 1960


Entry: 68312
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
7TH INFANTRY DIVISION, HEADQUARTER COMPANY, 2ND BATTLION, 32 REGIMENT

GLEN JONES wrote on December 19, 2008


City and State: KINGSPORT TN

Unit: 7TH INFANTRY DIVISION, HEADQUARTER COMPANY, 2ND BA

Service or Relationship: ARMY VETERAN

Comments:

Keywords: Member of Queens Own Infantry 7th Infantry Division, Headquarter Company, 2nd Battlion, 32 Regiment
Traveled all the way from Pusan to Manchurian border and fought on both coasts. Looking for anyone who might have been with me in Japan and Korea in 1949 -1950



Entry: 68170
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
4.2 MORTAR CO IN 32ND REGT,7TH INF DIV

JACKSON WATERS wrote on December 6, 2008


City and State: MOULTON AL

Unit: 4.2 MORTAR CO,32ND REGT,7TH INF DIV

Service or Relationship: ARMY VETERAN

Comments: i would like to hear from anyone that i sevre with or anyone that wasin my plt. ibelieve i was 3rd plt. our co was split up in differnt battion ,i never knew any one in the other plt,s i have several pictures of guys i serve with. 4.2 mortar co.32regt 7th inf div

Keywords: i was in korea from 7/51 to 7/52.my plt.leader was lt moulton phiefer from s.c


Entry: 68080
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
LOOKING FOR ANYONE WHO KNEW CPL NIGRO, NICHOLAS B-CO 32ND REG 7TH DIV 1950-52

NICHOLAS NIGRO III wrote on November 29, 2008


City and State: GA

Unit: A CO 1-121 INF

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: I have never been able to find any information about my grandfather and what he and his company did while in korea during 1950-52 i know he was in b co 7th div, 32nd inf reg, i would enjoy talking to anyone who may have known my grandfather or anyone in the same company just to hear about what their experience was like. I am a SGT in the army now and just recently graduated ranger school, i have been in oif II and III and am about to do my first tour in afghanistan. I thank anyone who reads this for your time and service.

Keywords: B co, 32nd inf reg, 7th div, 1950-52, Nigro,


Entry: 67980
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
2ND LIEUTENANT LV STEWARD

BYRON JUBERT wrote on November 22, 2008


City and State: MISSOURI CITY TX

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: My uncle was killed 12-30-1952 in North Korea. He was one of the very few black officers and I would be so honored if anyone could give me details on the circumstances of his death and any other information about his service?

Thanks so much.

Nephew Byron
832-584-9200


Keywords:


Entry: 67958
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
32ND REGIMENT KING COMPANY - JANE MANSFIELD HILL

TOM KINNARD wrote on November 20, 2008


City and State: BEDFORD TX

Unit:

Service or Relationship: NAVY VETERAN

Comments: My uncle, James Bleier, had his right leg from knee down blown off while attempting to take Jane Mansfield Hill on 10/23/52. As he was pulling himself down the hill he came across another wounded GI that could not move. He grabbed the GI's collar and procided to rotate between pulling him and himself down the hill where an armored tank truck discovered them and took them to safety. Of the 50 guys in the attempt, they were the only ones to servive. He was awarded the brozne star for his efforts.
I have been trying to gather information on him to put in a scrapbook for the family and have been unable to locate Jane Mansfield Hill, does anyone know anything about it?


Keywords:


Entry: 67883
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
CLARENCE V. FAVORITE

DEB SMITH wrote on November 15, 2008


City and State: THURMONT MD

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: My dad was in the 7th div, 32 infantry, Co. G. He would get a kick out of hearing from anyone who might remember him. Email me at shesadeb@aol.com.

Keywords: 7th div, 32 infantry, Co. G


Entry: 67590
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
REUNUINS

NILSA PEREZ wrote on October 23, 2008


City and State: COLUMBUS GA

Unit:

Service or Relationship: OTHER

Comments:

Keywords: Looking to have a military reunion? Please contact me...come to Fort Benning Georgia. Participate in Grand Opening of their Museum 2009. Pleae call me at 706 660 1000.


Entry: 67585
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
CHARLES F. NATIONS

KEVIN NATIONS wrote on October 23, 2008


City and State: BOSSIER CITY LA

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: Hi
Looking for anyone that served with my father Charles Franklin Nations from Monticello Mississippi (51-54). He died a few years ago. Just want to learn what type of soldier he was.

Cheers
Kevin


Keywords: Sgt 1st Class Charles Franklin Nations 7th Division G Company 2 Platoon


Entry: 67445
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
G CO, 32INF REGT. HAROLD

CHUCK CORDES wrote on October 7, 2008


City and State: RAPID CITY SD

Unit:

Service or Relationship: ARMY VETERAN

Comments:

Keywords: LOOKING FOR ANYONE WHO KNEW CPL HAROLD "WAYNE" MYERS. HE WAS WOUNDED TWICE WHILE SERVING WITH "G" COMPANY 32ND REGIMENT, 7TH ID. WAYNE WAS A QUIET GENTLEMAN WHO RETURNED TO SD RAISED A FAMILY AND RETIRED FROM THE FLOORING INDUSTRY MANY YEARS AGO. WOULD ENJOY HEARING FROM ANYONE WHO MAY HAVE SERVED WITH HIM IN KOREA. HE HAS A SCRAPBOOK WITH TONS OF PICTURES BUT NO NAMES. THANKS FOR YOUR HELP! CHUCK


Entry: 67400
32ND INFANTRY REGIMENT
REGARDING STORMY GARR

DANA KOAY wrote on October 3, 2008


City and State:

Unit:

Service or Relationship: FAMILY MEMBER

Comments: Stormy Garr was my uncle. If you or your father would like to contact the family, please email me. Stormy's older sister, Patsy (my mother), lives with me. His mother is also still alive (94 yrs) and lives with his younger sister. From what I remember from over the years, the soldier that murdered my uncle was sent to Leavenworth (I believe it was a life sentence). I think he has actually written my grandmother a letter expressing his remorse.

Keywords: Stormy Garr
Charles Humphries
Celeste Stevens
murder




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32nd Infantry Regiment